Four Ready To Go

The week we were back to mechanics pretty much full-time and only managed a little bit of work on the restoration projects we have on the go. These cars were all lined up waiting for their owners to collect them and we managed to grab a few nice pics before they were taken away.

Park & Pic Special

Ember Glow ’66 Coupe is a genuine GT option and a rare colour option. At the time it was not a popular colour, but now days is quite well sought after as a lot of the interiors were also two-tone.  This car was in for some cold start issues and a new battery.

The ’68 red convertible was in for some of our new Magnum 500 Alloy wheels. This particular style is popular because they are light, not as much upkeep as the chrome, still have the same look but just a little different from the rest. The new wheels warranted a full Geo setup and tune to get the best from the wheels and improve the handling. The raised white letter tyres matches the soft top fabric and our red centres matches the paint.

The ’67 v8 black convertible with deluxe interior was in for a little Mustang Maniac once over and then of for an MOT. This particular car is a real nice example of an untouched original car. 

The White ’66 Coupe was in for a little more work. The heads were to be replaced with our stock reconditioned heads. The pulleys were also cleaned and painted for a new fresh look.

The new ones were fitted after the paint had dried, then the new coated headers completed the clean engine look.

The rocker covers were replaced and the carb with a re-tune and timing just to be sure.

Once the engine was running again we then set about a little more cosmetic and suspension upgrades. The curved chrome Mote Carlo bar was a new edition to the engine bay, and an upgraded export brace to replace the standard shock tower braces. These changes not only look good but also make a big difference to the front end handling.

Another Testimonial:

One of our new customers picked up their car and took her home. We later received an email with lovely comment.

“First of all thank you for your hospitality and the rubber aerial seal and the keyring. The drive home was an absolute pleasure. I enjoyed driving the car before, now I LOVE IT. You and Alan definitely worked your magic on the Stang. You have transformed it from a good car to a great car.

I will be your life long loyal customer.”

Little emails like that makes us proud here at Mustang Maniac to know that the customer is happy with their car, and that they will get to enjoy it even more now. 🙂

Other News:

The 2018 model already being the most customizable Mustang ever, it also breaks new ground in personalization.

Ford is launching a new Personalize Your Pony experience on Facebook that allows Mustang fans to create their own iteration of the iconic emblem. They can then order clothing, mugs, phone cases and decals with their unique pony logo creation, and share the image with friends on social media channels. Enthusiasts can access a series of Mustang style packs – including variants from Shelby, Roush, Bullitt* and RTR Vehicles – and colors.

Ford will plaster the most popular pony designs across billboards in major North American cities this spring. If that is not bragging rights we don’t know what is!

Corey Holter, Ford car group marketing manager, said driving a Mustang has always been about standing apart from the crowd. “This is a chance for Mustang fans everywhere to make their very own personalized pony, then potentially have it shared where millions will be able to see it,” he said. Some fans will even be able to show off their creation with a customized grille badge for their own 2015 model year and newer Mustang.

What are you waiting for? Get over to Facebook and get busy.

Classic Cars Excel London 2018

It’s a known fact that Adam doesn’t do big car shows, “been there, done that and got the trophies as Adam would say, but on the odd occasion he will. Last weekend was one of those shows, the Classic Car Show at the London Excel Centre. This show is aimed at people wanting to buy classic cars rather than the trade style shows on how to restore them. The cars were all glistening and tip-top looking, in fact some were better than when they came out the factory. Adam took his much-loved KR to the show and was along side a few other great cars at the Mustang Owners Club of GB all weekend.

There was the usual interest in the car and somebody even argued that Carroll Shelby signed the name wrong on the glove box. It was explained that the signature was Cleo’s, unfortunately the little knowledge the gentleman had didn’t extend to Carroll’s wife!

There was a nice collection of Classic and some rare UK Fords:

Some iconic Classic British cars.

There was of course the Classic USA Fords; including a genuine GT350 up for sale with no price tag on show!

There was some Classic Super & Hyper cars, that already have the Classic status.

Check out the price tag for this Ferrari 250, got any spare change?

A section that was created for the show was called the “Getaway Cars” which was to show the most popular and well-known vehicles. We use the term vehicles because the well trusted “Ford Transit” was used in many a “job” at the time along with the legendary Lotus Cortina.

Speaking of Transits there was a specialised coachworks for a beautiful example.

The unusual cars and items for sale were not forgotten.

Perhaps the most iconic automobile that brought affordable travel independance to the masses was the Ford “Model T” which was also named the most influential car of the 20th Century. This car was also the first to be built on the fully moving production lines, changing the face of manufacturing as we know it. By 1918 over HALF the cars in the USA were Model Ts.

The last day Sunday 18th February 2018

During the show the guest of Honour was the ever popular 1992 Formula 1 world Champion & Indy Car World Champion 1993; Nigel (Red 5) Mansell who appeared on the Sunday to receive an achievement award. He drove a Formula 1 car indoors which made plenty of noise should we say, especially when doing donuts and lighting up the rear tyres. He signed autographs and done a couple of question and answer sessions which proved to be very popular and very informative.

His much loved race cars were on display which had a constant wall of people around them.

There was a stand that catered for the rich children with miniature versions of classic cars with petrol engines, maybe not quite the growling 427ci monsters under the hood, but a more modest single cylinder version.

Customers Cars:

Yogi and Paul got to work on the Classic Mustang rust spot; the lower cowl sections. On cars after ’66 they were a little easier to get to, but still need a lot of skill to replace as this also forms a structural part of the car. The thin and rusted through lower section can clearly be seen.

With the cowl removed the inner workings of the car can be seen. Welding the cowl back needs considerable care in order to not scorch or damage the rest of the car under the cowl.

We could bring more about this week, but we think the blog post is full enough, for now at least. Did anybody else go to the show and what were your thoughts?

Bubbling Away

For the last couple of posts we have asked you to send us some pictures of your cars so we can post them for you on our little ol’ blog. We’re pleased to say that you have taken us up on our offer, so please keep them coming. We had an email from Alan Bullock. He sent us a few lines with his pictures:

“I thought I would just tell you that my 1968 302 V8 (4 barrel carburetor) Red RHD Mustang Convertible Is 50 years old today and still looks wonderful. Thank you for you help in the past.”

In fact we like to think that the people who entrust their treasured cars to us have become more than just customers, they’ve also become our friends.

Customers Cars:

At Mustang Maniac we are never afraid to show the quality of our work and how we go about it all. Obviously we don’t show every single one of our little secrets, but we do show a lot of the processes. That way you know exactly what you are paying for. Last week we posted a repair of some rear quarter panels that had started to rust from the inside out. We received an email on what that would look like. We took some photo’s before hand of the metal worm in progress. A little bubble under the paint will often reveal a lot more than you expect.

Golden Convertible.

We showed a number of months ago the work starting on a restoration on a gold convertible, that work has started up again and we are working on the inside now.

Car Shows:

We have a car at “The London Classic Car Show” in the Excel Centre. Adam loaned a car to the Mustang Owners Club stand, his much-loved Shelby KR. This is a picture of the car before the crowds all started to arrive on the Thursday this week. We will bring you some more pictures of the show. Pop along to Mustang Owners Club of GB to say “Hi” and that the Mustang Maniac blog sent you along. The guys will appreciate it.

A Chilly Work Of Art:

We had this link sent to us and we thought that we would share it with you, especially if the weather is snowing where you are:

A Ford employee and Dearborn resident Jacob DiMaria’s creative snow sculpture isn’t your average snowman. 

 His creation – a 1965 Ford Mustang – took about 10 hours to construct Sunday and Monday after a big snowstorm in Metro Detroit. The sculpture is drawing lots of attention from his neighborhood, as well as from the Detroit Free Press and Channel 4 News. Reporters came out to his house to see the creation for themselves, and interview DiMaria and his wife Lizzie.

DiMaria said he and his siblings often made snow creations when they were kids and never really grew out of it. He built a little snow dog a few weeks ago on his back deck, but it was when his brother made a bear that he felt he had to step up his work. And so he turned to the Mustang. “I’ve always liked the ‘65 Mustang, plus the body lines were relatively easy to sculpt in snow,” he said. DiMaria, a technologist who has worked for Ford since July 2014, said his co-workers have gotten in on the fun, too, making many jokes. If it’s any reassurance to the design employees: DiMaria acknowledged that the car’s proportions are a little off – but it’s close. “It’s not perfect but it’s what it is,” he told the Free Press.

Mustang Manaic thinks that it’s pretty amazing, now who was it that said you can’t have fun in the snow?

Not us!

Keeping In Trim

Quite often we get emails sending us pics of cars they are thinking of buying and asking if it’s worth the money and should they buy it. There are lots of issues around this sort of thing, we virtually always decline to answer such questions. This is nothing personal of course, but we can’t see the car up close and inspect the things we need to before we pass any comments. If the car turns out to be a bag of rust, we will no doubt will get  the blame. Of course we could offer a valuation service to go and look at a car and advise, provided that all expenses and time are paid. Would people be willing to pay for the service? Let us know. Within the latest batch of emails this week we had a great email and on Facebook from somebody who still runs a classic Mustang as their daily driver. We think this is pretty cool and gave us an idea. Send us your pics of your car that you drive around in on a daily basis, then we can see just how many are on the road everyday out there. Is this a rare case or are there others out there? We will even put your pic on our blog to show the world on our new section; Daily Driver. This may be a one-off, but we hope not.

Daily Driver:

This was sent to us by Michael Joachim of his “Daily Driver”.  Now that is just cool.

Customers Cars:

We are getting on with Roy’s car and starting to put her back together. As soon as the glass goes back in the project looks half way there and a significant milestone has been reached. Once the windscreen was fitted and sealed in place the first of the nice trim parts were fitted in place.

The upper cowl section was refitted and the hood so that the gaps could then be set. Then the hood was taken of again ready for the heart of the car to go in. The engine was previously stripped, rebuilt and painted prior to fitting. Yogi and Paul a great team working together know how each other works and thinks, so this is poetry in motion to see.

The carb was fitted and the correct rocker swapped over leaving only the air pan to be fitted and checked for fit.

The carb needs to be tuned and setup, but not just yet though. The HT leads and distributer are fitted along with the basic wires from the new wiring loom.

Things seem to move very quickly with the large parts being fitted and then it all slows down again for the more detailed parts. The FMX gearbox was treated to a service and the oil was crisp and new as the day it was put in, which is always a good sign.

From there the gearbox was given a coat of red oxide then a coat of the black finish.

The gearbox was fitted to the engine and bolted in place.

The inside of the car was treated to some new carpets and padding.


Other News:

We have been asked about how the puppies are doing. We can say that the mum Shelby is now back on guard duty in the yard and the pups are growing up, fast. Warning: Cute puppy pics!

Aria Loves her dad!

They now have names; the white one is now called Cleo and the other rascal is called Aria.

These are the latest taken a couple of days ago and not quite so small.

Next week we will be bringing you some updates on the “Onion” and how that is getting on. Remember to send us pics of your Daily Driver.

Along For The Ride

Starting on Tuesday until the Friday next week is the annual SEMA 2017 show which Adam attends each year. However Adam tells us this is a chore and “Somebody has got to do it” suggesting that he doesn’t really want to go to fantastic city for the night life or being at America during the wonderful Halloween time. He also says that he has to go to a motor show and look around some pretty awesome and unique cars, innovative new parts and be distracted by some very pretty ladies promoting various companies products. After a stressful day he will be in need of some serious beers, not that we are jealous or anything of course. (Much). Seriously though Adam will not be back into the UK until the 14th November, he will have limited access to emails so please bear with us during this time.

Customer Cars:

We have the 69 Mach1 being worked on this week with the brakes and steering being fitted. The worthwhile upgrade for the cars is always the Borgeson power steering, and this little lady was getting just that along with a nice new shiny dual master cylinder and brake booster.

A new set of disc brakes to the front, no corners are cut here and even the bolts are sprayed silver to protect from rust and also for a little show.

The front suspension was replaced with nice new control arms, shocks and springs.

The brake pedal installed and connected up to the booster, followed by the top quality signature work from Yogi, his bespoke brake lines that are unmistakable and unique to each car.

All of a sudden the painted shell starts to look like a car again, from the outside just for now.


Another suspension upgrade on a convertible. The suspension over the years starts to degrade at such a slow rate that you don’t realise until one day you think to yourself there is something wrong here. So another replacement shocks, springs front and rear, control arms and updated sway bar. The next time the owners gets in this car it will feel totally different. First the old stuff.

Then the new parts fitted.

The great debate. (Yes – it still rages on)

It seems the next announcement from the lunatic asylum that is the DVLA is that while cars over 40 years are no longer required an MOT – any classic car (which they call historic cars) over 40 years old, but has had its power-to-weight ratio increased by more than 15% will require MOTing and then be assigned a Q plate, which will stay with the car for life and can’t be removed. The complete madness in a few examples:

Scenario 1: changed the carb from a smokey old relic to a modern more fuel-efficient fuel injection system….MOT/Q

Scenario 2: change the stock cast iron heads and manifold to a more efficient aluminium set….bingo you have a double whammy as not only have you increased the power you have also reduced the weight – seriously altering the power-to-weight ratio…..welcome back to MOT and Q!

Scenario 3: 1930s Ford fitted with a 350/350…..forget it!

It now seems since this latest “idea” was made by people in the DVLA that know about these things, (who obviously have an IQ the same as the number of wheels on their own cars), have now relented and will will not pursue the ‘power to weight ratio increase’ exclusion in the MOT exemption process. While there might be some kit cars and some heavily modified vehicles that will still require an MOT, all other classics will not. This means that Mustangs that have been “improved” will still classify as historic. About time that somebody took a long look at what they are trying to achieve. Virtually nobody wanted this to change, so “If it ain’t broke – don’t fix it!”

Ken Block is at it again with Gymkhana 10 Trailer. 

We have been sent this link to a trailer on YouTube (thanks Gary), for the latest instalment of the fire-breathing AWD Mustang now with 1200bhp and twin turbos. We were lucky enough to see the car last year at SEMA. We can’t wait for this next instalment!

We hope to bring you some pictures from SEMA again this year so watch this space.

Have a safe trip and not to stressful “working” break Adam.

Perfection By The Pyrenees

The best part of our job is hearing about the adventures the cars get to go once they have left our workshops. One such example of that is our friend Roger (thanks for the pics by the way), who has taken his Convertible on a road trip around France. This little lady is sitting outside a house in Pau which was built in 1880:

This last pic was taken with the Pyrenees Alps in the background.

The car has been driven for hundreds of miles now and the car hasn’t missed a beat. That is what we call pleasurable driving, a classic mustang, roof down in beautiful countryside with the Pyrenees in the background, just perfect. Do you have any pics of your cars on road trips? If so send them in to us and we will post them up for you.

Customer Cars

We have had a car in where she was not running very well. So we needed to do some diagnostics to find out the reason. We narrowed it down to number seven cylinder pretty quickly, taking the plug lead of made no difference to the running. So we changed the basics of the plug, the lead and the checked points gaps etc. nothing was working. So we had to take the heads off to see what was going on. Yogi got to it straight away – a burnt valve was causing the issues by the looks of it. The valve seat would need to be reground and the valve along with its spring would need be replaced for a start. But, if you are going to do that for one valve you may as well do the lot all at the same time to be on the safe side, as you certainly don’t want to keep doing this time-consuming job that’s for sure.

Having that sort of work done starts to become expensive, so the plan was to replace the heads with some reconditioned ones we held in stock.

These new heads were replaced with their new gaskets obviously and when we fired her up – the problem has gone! We will need to road test more, recheck the torque for the head bolts and set up the carb and check the timing. But initial tests are exactly what we were expecting.


Many Mustangs are still driving around with the original seats in place, there is absolutely nothing wrong with this at all by the way, in fact its best to keep the rarer examples exactly as they were. However when the foam goes soft offering no support then the time is right to replace them, now you could replace the original covers back on, or go for an upgrade like this customer has done.

Firstly the old seats which were fine to look at but the foams inside had collapsed and made it slightly uncomfortable to drive:

The upgrade was to our Pony Interior set of seat covers. This will still match the original door cards and the interior paint job. The side chrome “hockey stick” trims were also replaced as they tend to get scratched quite easily too.

A subtly difference, but it makes the interior look much more luxurious. Not the cheapest of upgrades it has to be said, but what a difference!

Add Ons

We have seen the argument for the “independent” rear suspensions on the Classic Mustangs, there are obviously two sides to each discussion. Once the aftermarket bolt-ons have been added for a while, they are usually taken off and end up in the scrap skip. The main point is here that although you can remove the leaf springs and put various coils, shocks and traction bars onto the rear axle, however, the rear axle is hollow heavy tube in effect, so each side of the suspension will never be independent from each other, this set up is known as a “live” rear axle. Here is the setup that has been removed from a ’68 390 fastback.

The correct suspensions was added back to the ‘car which now looks neater, sits correctly and handles how they should and more predictable. The best bit? The car is pleasant to drive again without any rattle, bang or clunk or sound track, just like you are towing a crate of tin cans up the road!

We have another ’66 convertible which is in for some routine annual service. But we can see some rare options of the headlight doors having a chrome trim around the front. It give the car a totally different look.


We were sent an email (thanks Gary), to say that he had found something on YouTube that we might like, so we decided to share it with you.

We can’t take the credit for this one but the original is located here.

Shelby GT500 DeAgostini 1:8th Model Update

Another delivery from DeAgostini has moved us to within one more delivery for completion. The build log has been updated and can be found by clicking here. or cut and paste the link here to your browser.

So we have added a few little pics to show the progress again.

We cant wait till the build is finished now as it’s been almost two years.