All’s Gone Quiet

Over the last couple days the weather in the UK has taken a turn for the worse after a very nice hot spell. A thunder-storm has taken its toll on the Mustang Maniac phones due to a bolt of lightning landed in the field behind us on Friday, since then the phones have been down and doing things they really shouldn’t be doing. We managed to get the internet back up and running for the WebShop in order to process the orders and dispatch. We have had a few emails complaining about the fact we are not answering the phones, we are doing everything we can to fix the issue as soon as we can, we have reported the problem and we are expecting the phone system engineers out Monday. As the Mustang Maniac offices have switched over to web-based business model now, this shouldn’t be a problem for parts ordering. The phones should now only be used for booking in jobs to our workshops, which can still also be done via emails.

 

Adam’s Words of Wisdom

Over the last month or Mustang Maniac have had a number of cars come into us for some work, but all is not what it seemed. The problem is that due to fact that these cars are commanding good money and that can be exploited. What we have seen is that some of the cars that have been imported into the UK have been advertised as one thing, but the VIN number says something very different. Common examples are the old favorite where a six cylinder has been passed off as a genuine v8. Yes of course the fittings can all be changed over as they should be, but if you are paying top dollar for a Mustang v8, the value will never be what it should be due to its original build history. For obvious reasons we won’t be showing examples of this for customer privacy, and the world doesn’t need to know. We have seen VIN numbers welded in place from other cars, letters stamped incorrectly and whole panels replaced just to get the VIN numbers correct. The visible VIN is different to the hidden VIN or door tag etc.

Adam has said to many people; “If you are importing the car yourself, do you homework first”. ‘Get photos of the VIN numbers and check it out along with the door tags. If the tags don’t match, or you see something different to what the ID tags say, ask questions, lots of questions”.

We are not saying anybody in particular is doing this, it may have even been done by the original vendor in another country and by the time it arrives here it’s all to late. Perhaps the different door tag is down to a replacement door after a minor fender bender, which all would be explained quite happily. On the other hand it could be for more sinister reasons.

Adam has developed an extremely comprehensive VIN and door tag decoder, with many variables that are not on other data bases, just for this reason. If you take your car into Mustang Maniac for any work to be done, if you then ask Adam nicely, he may well print the details of your car out for you.

Customer Cars

While we are on the subject of taking people words for it we were told that a gearbox had been “Serviced” recently, but was still not behaving how it should have been. When we took it apart we found out why. The date that was scratched on the Gearbox filter said “24/4/’81”. Another reason not to just take somebody’s word for it.

After the proper service from us and adjustments all was working again and performing just how it should do.

In the hot weather we have had a few gaskets blown due to the extra strains on the older and more consumer parts of the car should we say. This car had an unusual intake manifold gasket fail which of course causes some major problems.

Like all these things, if one side has gone do the other side as well as a matter of course. Cleaning the old gasket off and prep work of the metal to metal faces is crucial for a good seal of the gaskets. At least this wasn’t the head gaskets which of course is a much bigger job and more costly.

Car Shows

Last weekend the car show was the ‘Damn Yankees Summer Slam’ held at North Weald Airfield. This is another very well supported car show and the Mustang Maniac “massive” were on convoy to go along and play, of course the only photo’s were taken were of Mustangs!

We were told that Yogi was “Chillin'” and we are not quite sure what this hand gesture was all about, at least it wasn’t his normal hand gesturing to other drivers when they drive badly. Not that he bothers with that sort of thing, most of the time he just stamps on the loud pedal and they only get to see his exhaust tips disappearing into the distance.

On the way back from a great turn out at the show, it was decided that as the day was all bout the ‘Americana’ theme we stopped of at a ‘Arnolds diner’, another favourite venue of the Mustang Massive. 😉

What a great way to end the day. Just in case you thought that was the real Elvis outside the diner, its not. 🙂

Another 1 Done

The end of the week was made that bit special for us as a long project received a final push over the line and reached a massive milestone. With regards to the heading we obviously mean another Mach1 is fully restored and on the road after passing her nut and bolt restoration’s first MOT. Jacqui’s full ’69 restoration was driven to the MOT centre where it passed with flying colours.  We have broken our own little protocol here by posting about the car, before it’s officially handed back over. We have a couple of outstanding finishing touches like refitting of the door cards and swapping over the steering wheel, but nothing major at all. Then Jacqui’s Mach1 is completely finished. So we thought it was OK to post a little earlier than normal.

Here the car is ready to go for the final road test and Paul took a great video of the occasion. We deliberately left the door cards off just in case we need to adjust anything in the door itself, such as rattles and squeaks etc. etc. Yogi takes the car out the yard and stops to make final adjustments to mirrors etc. We think it was more like the bear wanted more camera time from what we can tell! Just sayin’!

Roy & Jacqui turned up on Saturday after the good news and took a look at their little lady. Roy couldn’t wait to drive her around the yard for a little drive, and the smile says it all. To us that makes it all worth while.

Where’s were the sunglasses Roy??? 

The inside is once again a lovely place to be now;

Yogi has been busy adding the final touches under the hood – the stickers. The attention to detail with regards to the zinc fittings says it all, you don’t notice them straight away which means they are not out-of-place. But when you do you spot them, the wow factor is there. Gas of the aircon to keep cool in the current fine weather is also next on the shrinking small list of things to do, but when a car is this cool do you need gas?

But there is one sticker that you can’t buy from us, in effect it’s awarded and never just given; The Mustang Maniac Restoration Number. Discreet and out the way, but those who know, we mean really know about “restored” Mustangs, they will look for this ultimate seal of approval.

Soon Jacqui, really soon then she is all yours again. 

More Enfield Pageant 2018

A huge thanks to Gábor Kiss who has sent us a link to his Google Drive cloud storage where we could take a look at his pictures he had taken of our cars on show. We were given the kind permission to use what we wanted, so we downloaded the lot! Super high-resolution and some great work here, we appreciate his time and effort to take the photos and allow us to use them.

If you have any photo’s you wish to send us please let us know and we will post them up for you.

Enfield Pageant 2018 Part 2

We continue the post today by picking up where we left off with the first instalment yesterday. About the similar time of day to yesterday the cars turned up with a brighter start to the day, just as we were looking for breakfast.

The Mustang Maniac pitch was again full with a change of some of the vehicles.

There was main tent where there was a rockabilly band and a few rare cars inside. The band had a new member this year, a little by playing a small double bass. It looked like he was enjoying the show too.

There was other areas for some music and playing various types of music during the day and well into the evening where there was a beer tent to keep you cool in the hot weather.

Back to cars where the mass production was in full swing.

Throughout the day in the middle arena there was little shows and a stunt show. We managed to capture some of the high-flying bikes. They’re mad, simple as that but spectacular to watch.

There was a good selection of UK classic racing cars at the show, along with some great iconic cars.

The biggest vehicles we could find to the smallest.

Saturday started of damp and ended up sunny, Sunday started sunny and a downpour at six in the evening. We haven’t been to Enfield pageant yet where it has remained dry for all the weekend. But we shall see next year maybe?

Thanks to everybody who turned up to say hello to us and park on the pitch over the weekend.

It was a pleasure. See you again next year.

 

Enfield Pageant 2018 Part 1

The time of year is the much-anticipated Enfield Pageant of Motoring and the show that Mustang Maniac, their friends and customers show up to be on the pitch with Adam. The organisers have spread out the stands right across the filed now, giving the feeling of not being crushed in. Mustang Maniac was there on Saturday with a steady stream of cars arriving with a total of twelve cars, plus a flat-bed lorry and a Ford support unit Ranger, so it was busy to say the least. Adam already had three cars there and the rest of the supporters all followed in a little before nine. The best part is Adam’s 2016 Ecoboost was next to Mart’s ’66 coupe, that’s fifty years between them.

The weather was a little damp and few spots of rain to start with, but the sun started to shine and the cars and people started to flood into the show as well.

There was a rumour that Yogi didn’t want to put petrol in his car at 10mpg so he got a lift from Adam’s new truck. However, Yogi tells us that it was the best way to get more vehicles to the show. Once his car was in place he posed by his car with his new custom shirt on. First job of the day was the living accommodation and food. A much-needed break after all the “hard” work so Adam sits with his Dad for a well-earned cup of tea.

We have a little quiz for you: What is the odd one out from this collection of cars? The answer will be at the end of the post.

No point in being at a car show without photos. So we decided to split the post into two to make it easier to handle. In no particular order we just tried to batch them up that’s all.

There was plenty for sale, the usual stuff and the unexpected! This ’66 Mustang coupe was pretty battered, but looked a solid enough car without getting to involved with it. Could be yours for £8,500, but it doesn’t come with the carb though.

The answer to the little quiz above: Roy’s Copper coloured ’69 Coupe doesn’t have external mirrors. And you thought we were gonna say it was the Chevy Camaro! But, according to one person who was looking around “impressing” his buddies, the Chevy was in fact a “Shelby”. We didn’t respond to the comment, whats the point? 😀

Tomorrow we will bring you more of the best cars we liked and the show and what  the entertainment was like over the weekend as well.

Bearing Down

Last week report on a pretty epic engine fail which has now been addressed and the car is back on the road again. To soften that shock to the system we have given pride of place for our Park & Pic series this week. In fact it’s a double Park & Pic so it’s a first there for us too. We have a pretty big post for you to cover yet another busy week at Mustang Maniac.

Park & Pic

This ’69 convertible is a rare original colour of “Black Jade”. There are now two options for the pic, the front of house shots.

Or, the Yard shot with Adam’s stainless steel laser cut MM logo.

We can’t make our mind up for the best set of pics, but we thing the steel horse shots are pretty cool.

This is the car that had the engine failure and the engine was swapped out with one of our in stock 302ci engines. How many other suppliers can say that? Adam has a good supply of engines he keeps and are not on the WebShop, some of the “secret stash” of engines are the “stroker” versions for plenty of power, but be prepared to get your money of those little beauties. That’s providing that Adam will sell you one in the first place!  Anyway, the engine was primed with oil before it’s started up and here we have the video of that process. You can just about make out the oil being pumped to the top of the heads. Hang on – should we be giving away our little secrets??

Once the oil is pumped around the system it can be fired up without fear of metal on metal wear for few seconds.

Customer Cars:

From the heading you probably guessed that we had another failure, but this is much more common and in some ways more dangerous. The front wheel bearing was grinding and was about to self destruct in a pretty big way. Paul had taken a video of the bearing and how bad it actually was. The first part of the video you can hear the damaged bearing and then Paul shows the movement.

Once the wheel was off we always inspect for collateral damage as well maybe on the spindles etc. the bearings was in a bad way.

The new bearings packed and ready to fit.

The shocks were not helping the matter very much so it was decided to replace them at the same time.

Like all these things they should be replaced in pairs and then the wheel alignment was to be done after a quick road test to bed down. We are pleased to say all is wheel and we now have another safe Mustang back on the road.

Ford Technical Article

We haven’t had a technical article for a while but we have been asked the question about a concours replacement cylinder heads so we can help out a little, well a lot actually here.

One of our loyal long-standing customers owns a rare and very early Mustang – one of the 8000 built by Ford as ‘launch stock’ before April 17 1964. They had planned to build one per dealer to support the launch at the New York World Fair.

We have given this precious car a lot of love and attention over the years while trying to preserve as much originality as possible. One of the first issues we found some time ago was a mysterious intermittent ‘poor running’ which seemed to come and go at will. With our best investigative heads put to full deployment we went through the normal checks – timing, leads, valve clearances and compression checks.  As an early and rare ‘D code’ car we first thought it must be the troublesome Autolite 4 barrel carb – but we had worked our magic on that earlier and it was spot on. Our compression checks proved to highlight a strange issue.  As it pays to be thorough and check… then check again, we found that on one cylinder the results from a series of compression tests resulted in wildly differing readings. We have seen this situation on a few rare occasions and it pointed to ‘valve seat trouble’. We suspected that the valve seats were worn or damaged and, as the valve turns slightly when running, it was leaking gas randomly.

“Off with the heads!” was response the from the Mustang Oracle – Adam.

Once the heads were removed and disassembled our diagnosis was proved to be pretty much spot on.  The car was needed back on the road as it was booked in for some show work so we took heads that we had ‘in stock’ and got the car rebuilt and running sweetly.  In the meantime, as this car is a really early example and after chatting to the owner, we decided to fully restore the cylinder heads to keep the original engine intact. This also allowed us to dig into the history of the Ford V8 298 – a true iconic piece of engineering;

Ford introduced the 289, a development of the 260 during 1963 with the plan for it to be fitted to certain full-sized Fords and the new Mustang. It was produced in Fords Cleveland and Windsor factories and was to become the mainstay of Fords car and performance car programme for decades.

When we looked at the markings on the heads Adam felt that they were unusual and that he had not seen the specific markings before – most of the Mustangs he had come across had 1964/5/6 date markings but these heads were different.

Both heads had casting marks of C3AE:

C: being the decade of manufacture – in this case 1960s.

3: being the year in the decade – in this case 1963.

A: being the vehicle type – in this case ‘generic’ Ford meaning they could be fitted to a number of models.

E: denoting the component type – in this case and engine part.

So these were very early cylinder head castings of the new 289 engine and produced in the earliest batch of production. The next question was when?

The date code cast into each head was different – but this was normal as the components were cast at one of two factories in batches and then machined/assembled as required later – up to 3 months later.

Head one was date stamped 3L27 and with a W so it was cast on November 27 1963 and was the 4260th to be machined.

Head two was date stamped 3G25 and with a C so it was cast on July 25 1963 and was the 5150th to be machined.

To some this might seem odd as you would expect that they would both have very similar date stamps but this is not at all unusual when you consider the manufacturing and engine building process.  Both heads were cast and machined in the first run of 289 components but at different factories – due to capacity and manpower availability. Both would then have been put into a stock pile of raw castings prior to machining as and when required.

Typically Ford would cast components in large batches – blocks, cylinder heads for various engine lines etc. in addition Ford was building components and engines for the new Mustang launch early the following year so would have been stockpiling ready for engine production early in 1964. While lengthy storage of raw cast iron does not create any real problems, the completed engines were only typically stored ready for up to three months – often it was much sooner.

Both heads appear to have been machined in the same production run ready for engine assembly.  So these cylinder heads were fitted to an engine in early 1964 and that engine was fitted to the car in our workshop on April 16 1964. It all fits nicely!

Now we knew that these heads were part of the early history of the 289 it was important to restore them carefully and sympathetically.  First the heads were completely stripped, crack tested  and then given a thorough clean and degrease – it was then that we could really see the wear and tear created over the years.  All the exhaust valve seats were damaged and recessed and the valve guides also needed replacing.  Some companies replace worn valve guides with a bronze/brass guide which works well enough, but is not as durable as the original material.  We bored out the cylinder heads to accept a specially made steel sleeve type guide which looks better (I know only a few will see them but we know it’s been done properly) and the new guides were pressed into the head.

The heads were then planned and all mating faces were machined. Once all was correct, new valves and stem seals were fitted and the heads were given a coat of factory finish black paint.

The owner is extremely pleased with the loving care and attention we have given to these important parts and they are now wrapped up in storage for fitting to the car at some later point.

We are pleased with the result for a number of reasons:

It’s nice to be able to keep very early Mustangs on the road and still running sweetly.

It’s great to be able to add to our knowledge of these cars and have a better understanding of how they were made.

It’s always good to confirm that Adam can call on his enormous knowledge to quickly spot rare and unusual Mustangs when they appear.

We have found a document about Ford Engineering numbers:

A special Thanks to Gary W, for the photo’s and the technical detail write-up for us.  

Other News:

Next week starting on the Saturday to the Monday will be the Enfield Pageant of Motoring, our local large show that we support.

We look forward to seeing you there, pop along and say hello and look at the selection of cars we will have on show, maybe even talk to the owners who will be with us. for the weekend.

Enjoy the sun while it lasts looking at great cars.

Going Loco In Acapulco

For once we can say that the weather has bought out the cars and its great to see them on the road. It makes a change from us saying a couple of months back drive carefully in snow and ice. Speaking of driving carefully brings us onto our Park & Pic this week;

Park & Pic

Our friend and loyal customer Mart D. has finally got his car out the garage to get it M.O.T’ed with us. We know that the car’s MOT had run out in early December last year and has been SORN (Statutory Off Road Notification). In the mean time his car has been wrapped in cotton wool in the heated and dehumidified garage of his. Mart and his OCD issues wouldn’t allow him to bring it out in the rain just in case it shrunk apparently! Still it’s nice to see his ’66 Coupe in Acapulco blue in the sun, it’s just we are not on holiday in the real Acapulco, Mexico. We have done an extensive guide of the full restoration of his car from being a real mess of a shell, to being at the NEC Classic Car Show some four years later when it was finished. Click here for the link to see all the work. It’s a very large page so give ita few moments to load.

The car had a time slot with our MOT guys, trouble was that Mart would be driving it there. Let’s just say that he is worse than useless with directions, he has even got lost with a Sat-Nav (honestly). All of this is being said with Marts knowledge and he will be the first to admit it as well. 😀 Anyway we gave him the Sat-Nav details, we gave him verbal description on how to get there from both Adam and Morgan. With that he set off at about quarter to eleven for the fifteen minute journey. Just as he was leaving Yogi sent him a message to remind him that the MOT centre shuts at three pm on a saturday, therefore he would need to get a move on. 😀  Anyway twenty-five minutes later we got the text to say he had found it and was feeling very proud of himself! Apparently he had driven carefully watching “The other nutters on the road who were intent on trying to mash my motor up.” Again, those we only printable words we could use on a family blog.

A little while later the car had passed with flying colours and he was on the way back to us. There was a tiniest leak from the water thermostat housing that needed a little tighten up. Mart got stressed about it as he had to clean that part of the engine (again). This is fairly common as the chrome housings can go slightly out of shape causing a tiny drip now and again, which only needs a little tighten up to reseal again.

Customer Cars

The Gold Convertible has been for the initial road test and things didn’t go to plan. Yogi took her round the usual route, country lanes for handling, dual carriageway for a cruising test and round abouts and junctions for brakes.

The car was tuned to default and the road tes started. Once the car got onto the main dual carriageway there was the dreaded drone and an increasing wobble on the steering. Front wheel bearing had decided to implode. Yogi being on the ball pulled over immediately and stopped and noticed the smoke from the hub of the wheel. As LAR headquarters were only a couple of miles away now a recovery was required to prevent more damage. The car was put straight back into the Yogi cave where the strip down started to get the bearing off and this is what was left after the race and bearing had destroyed each other. Not the nice neat unit you would expect. Although it was all greased you just need one rod to fracture and it will take everything with it. Not every single road test goes to plan, That why we do them – to make sure we are happy with it before we hand it over. The good part is that it happened to us and we managed to not damage the spindles as we knew what was going on. This could have happened at any time and there is no way to predict a bearing failure of this proportion unfortunately.

Now we would have to replace the wheel bearings on both sides and the steering realigned as a result.

The car would then take another road test to check the wheel alignment and make sure all was OK once again.

As the sun was out we put the roof up! Yep UP. That way the warmth of the sun can help stretch the stiff new material into place and help the folded creases to fall out too.

Other News:

Adams new purchase is this little rarity anybody recognise it?

This is one of those rarity gearboxes; a Super T10. We found this information on the gearbox and it’s background and why it’s such a sort after gearbox. We thought we would give you a little techy article post which we found on a Borg Warner Tech spec site;

American car manufacturers had to scramble in the early part of the 1960s to get a four speed transmission for their performance cars. All the money was tied up in automatic transmission tooling and production as a high profit option. The base units ran three speed column shift manuals. The torque laden engines didn’t really need a fourth gear for regular driving. Once speed became important, so did an extra gear and a floor shifter. Detroit made do with the Borg Warner T-85 which was a three speed unit. It was tough and that’s why they used it. The T-85 box was the starting place for the new Borg Warner T-10 four speed.
One of the earliest models to get the four speed was the Corvette. It appeared in 1957 and helped make it a real sports car contender along with the 283 V8. What engineers did was use the T-85 main case and add a reverse gear into the extension housing, making room for fourth gear. The main cases were aluminum on Corvettes. Other Chevrolet cars used cast iron cases until 1962. The T-10 was considered a heavy-duty transmission at the time and was issued with high performances engines of the early 1960s.  You’ll see these behind 283 fuelies, 348s, Pontiac 389s and even Mopars used them until their own unit was ready in late 1963.
The Super T-10:
Competition ended the T-10’s domination in cars. Muncie, Saginaw and New Process all developed their own four speed boxes, each capable of handling high torque and sustained power. By 1965, wide-spread use of the T-10 was easing. Buick held on until 1966 and Corvette remained the sole factory player by 1967. The story doesn’t end there. Drag racing uncovered some weaknesses in the original design and research  efforts by many racers developed new tricks to improve the basic design. This and a selection of different gear clusters kept the T-10 active. A result of all this R&D was the release of the Super T-10 in 1969. This revised transmission had an iron main case instead of aluminum. The gear sets were larger than the originals for added strength  yet were smaller than either Muncie or New Process gears. The Super T-10 gears were 9310 high nickel alloy and were coarse cut for better load capacity. You also got more ratios to pick from.The Super T-10 was sorely needed as muscle cars were very powerful by the end of the decade. More changes were made in production and an aftermarket over the counter version was offered called Power Brute.  You could order new ratios, heavy-duty synchro sleeves and generally improved parts. The GM Super T-10s were about 92 pounds while big car Ford Super T-10s came in around 101 pounds.

Ford used three versions of T-10s in their cars. The light cars used a 2.73:1 low gear, 2.06:1 second and 1.62:1  third gear. As in all other applications fourth gear is direct drive. The big block Galaxie used 2.36:1 low gear, 1.62:1 second gear and 1.76:1 third gear. The third Ford T-10 used 2.36:1 low gear, 1.76:1 second gear and 1.41 for third gear.Mopar T-10s: Chrysler used two different gear sets for their T-10s. The standard set was 2.54:1 for 1st gear, 1,89:1 for second gear and 1.51:1 for third. The close ratio set was 2.20:1 low, 1.64:1 second and 1.31 third gear.

Classic T-10 Mods from the 60s & 70s:
 The aluminum main case is a bit fragile for heavy race use. The gear shafts are prone to flexing under high loads. This is one reason why the Muncie and especially the M22 was preferred equipment and still highly desirable to this day. While Borg Warner didn’t release a high twist gear set like the M22, they did come up with a second revision Super T-10 in 1975. The Super T-10 gear shafts are tougher as they’re made from high nickel content. For a brief period it was the hot set up to install Super T-10 shafts inside an aluminum main case. You saved about 30 pounds but had to go through the expense of modifying case to fit a late-model shaft. Wear rate increased because the nickel shafts could crack the trans shift cover, then your case in that order. This mod was dropped after a few years.  Another more worthwhile tip is using the Ford T-10 shifter arms and shafts. They used a 3/8-inch stud which is thicker than the 5/16 GM shafts.  If your T-10 has the older bearings with non grooved sleeve go for an upgrade. Borg Warner has used the heavy-duty bearings  since 1975. Power Brute aftermarket bearings were available starting in 1972 and have appeared in some production cases. For GM cars, the Buick 27-spline main shaft takes high rpm launch stresses better than Chevrolet main shafts.

We finish with a couple of nice pics where Adam says make sure your dogs have plenty of clean fresh water in this heat, looks like they are enjoying the sun too.

Out the Mould

This week Adam has been eagerly waiting for his next delivery of some rather special parts, this time they are not from the USA. Adam has had a set of moulds made for his next project car that we will be bringing you via our blog the full project build from scratch to being on the road. The ever popular ’67 Eleanor from the movie remake of “Gone In Sixty Seconds” has fans all around the world, and is always a popular car at shows. In the past Adam has already built three Eleanors as bespoke orders and knows all to well the issues with the kits out there, obtaining the correct dimensions and good quality parts for the body kit has been challenging to say the least. As a result a FULL set of the seventeen component parts mouldings has been made for our own exact replica Eleanor kit. We are not sure how Adam has managed to get the moulds so accurate, when we ask how, he just laughs and says, “I just know a few people; don’t ask!” We now know how he done it – but don’t ask us either! 🙂 Our new moulds have had the first prototype casting delivered to Mustang Maniac for their sign off inspection. So far Adam is very pleased with the results, they are a good thick material and not flimsy like some of the others out there, the finish is pretty much paint ready as well which means minimal paint prep. As yet Adam is undecided if he will sell the kits as a full seventeen piece kit, or individual parts of the kit. So watch this space and the WebShop for details.

Adam inspects the first mould of the Mustang Maniac Eleanor Kit:

How cool is that? If you want a full kit for a GT500 Eleanor, or just a part of the set – let Adam know, he may start to stock them if he gets enough interest.

Customers Cars

The storage area is looking quite full at the moment, from early Ford Cortina to Ford LTD.

The cowl has been fitted to the properly now and any smoothing has been done ready for paint. The rest of the inside is starting to go back in ready for the dash pad later. The engine bay is now ready and running and can be driven again. We are expecting the pick up for paint to be done this week.

The Falcon Sprint

The general inspection of the brakes turned up a worrying, yet a common fault. Leaking brake cylinders can appear from nowhere especially after the car has sat for a while. The leak doesn’t usually happen when the car sits there but rather when they start to get used again, the rubber can perish and the pistons can rust a little and wear away the seals a little then they start to leak. Here we see a single side leaking and has soaked the brake shoes with brake fluid, there will be no braking this side at the rear. As a precaution you should always change both sides.

We suggest if the car has been standing, check the brakes before you move the car, apply the brakes a number of times before you drive it. Take it for a gentle drive and bring back home. Check the brakes again but remove the drum to inspect carefully. If in doubt, don’t mess about – take the car to somebody who knows what they are doing. That brake pedal is probably one of the most important things in your car.

Here we can see the removed shoes and the damage from the fluid leak. Replacing and bleeding should also be done at the point of changing the cylinders.

We expect to see a few more of these now the show season is almost apon us.

Be safe – Check your brakes!