Got The Hump?

The pace has calmed down a little in the yard we are pleased to say, and we concentrating on the general servicing on the cars we have waiting for us. We have also been working on a pretty unique car in the mean time which has brought with it its own problems for us to sort out, and we have learned from it all in the process. You will have to wait a while until we bring that story in another post soon. Last week we posted a little early about Jacqui’s fully restored ’69, as we predicted the car was completed with no problems a few days later. Here we have a quick snap as the car was picked up and taken home with Roy in the driving seat and Jacqui riding shot-gun. (What – still no sunglasses Roy?) 😂

The interior needed the finishing touches and then another final road test. It was an excuse really to drive this lovely lady. The steering wheel was the last decision and what a great choice it was too.

The door cards were ok, and could have been fitted back on, however there was a small tear on the driver’s side by the handle, a common place to show wear. When you have gone to this much trouble, it’s all down to the details. The carpet on the doors looked ok, until you compare them to the new carpet. The looked positively grey next to the black carpet in fact. So to keep as much originality as possible we transferred as many parts as we could to the new door cards. The result is we have a restored car that looks as though it’s being used and retains the original character of the car.

The centre console was fixed in place and final trim fittings added. Then the final drive to check for rattles and squeaks but all was good and Jacqui got the call. “She’s all done and ready for you.”

Enjoy the car, she’s a beauty.

Customer Cars

There were so many options available on the early Mustang when you ordered one, that all the combinations reportedly “ran into the millions”. A fairly expensive option at the time was the centre console. This was either full all the way up under the dash or had the even more expensive factory air-con option under the dash and the alternative console fitted under that with different fittings. To get genuine original parts are rare, fragile and can be silly expensive unless you “go repro”! The long transmission tunnel can be a large expanse of carpet, so if you want the best of both worlds there is an answer, Hump Hugger. The Hump Hugger fits all cars from ’64 to ’73 and comes in a wide range of colours to match your interior. The best part? It’s held in place by velcro that won’t let go when you drive around a corner, so there’s no drilling or extra holes to be made, which means it can be removed at any time. We have some pics of the unit in place courtesy of our friend Lance who treated himself to one.

What more could you want? A compartment to hold your old 8 track cassettes and a couple of cup holders for your caffeine fix. These are special order items from us, click here for details, but with our regular deliveries it won’t take long to get to us. Copy the link below to your browser for this colour:

https://mustangmaniac.co.uk/part/59/7316/64-73_humphugger_console_l_blue

As  Father’s day is on the 17th June next weekend. We have lots of stock, from a few washers all the way to a complete body shell all online from our WebShop, no need to call us. If in doubt what to spoil that special man in your life with; Mustang Maniac gift vouchers are the way to go and you just can’t go wrong.

Enfield Pageant 2018 Part 1

The time of year is the much-anticipated Enfield Pageant of Motoring and the show that Mustang Maniac, their friends and customers show up to be on the pitch with Adam. The organisers have spread out the stands right across the filed now, giving the feeling of not being crushed in. Mustang Maniac was there on Saturday with a steady stream of cars arriving with a total of twelve cars, plus a flat-bed lorry and a Ford support unit Ranger, so it was busy to say the least. Adam already had three cars there and the rest of the supporters all followed in a little before nine. The best part is Adam’s 2016 Ecoboost was next to Mart’s ’66 coupe, that’s fifty years between them.

The weather was a little damp and few spots of rain to start with, but the sun started to shine and the cars and people started to flood into the show as well.

There was a rumour that Yogi didn’t want to put petrol in his car at 10mpg so he got a lift from Adam’s new truck. However, Yogi tells us that it was the best way to get more vehicles to the show. Once his car was in place he posed by his car with his new custom shirt on. First job of the day was the living accommodation and food. A much-needed break after all the “hard” work so Adam sits with his Dad for a well-earned cup of tea.

We have a little quiz for you: What is the odd one out from this collection of cars? The answer will be at the end of the post.

No point in being at a car show without photos. So we decided to split the post into two to make it easier to handle. In no particular order we just tried to batch them up that’s all.

There was plenty for sale, the usual stuff and the unexpected! This ’66 Mustang coupe was pretty battered, but looked a solid enough car without getting to involved with it. Could be yours for £8,500, but it doesn’t come with the carb though.

The answer to the little quiz above: Roy’s Copper coloured ’69 Coupe doesn’t have external mirrors. And you thought we were gonna say it was the Chevy Camaro! But, according to one person who was looking around “impressing” his buddies, the Chevy was in fact a “Shelby”. We didn’t respond to the comment, whats the point? 😀

Tomorrow we will bring you more of the best cars we liked and the show and what  the entertainment was like over the weekend as well.

Tops Off

We like to pride ourselves on being one of the best in the country if not “The Best” for Mustang restorations, our customers are loyal and return on a regular basis whether for a standard service, repairs or upgrades. A number of our customers have more than one Classic Car and not all them are Mustangs. So on the odd occasion for the good customers and friends of ours we will make exceptions. This week was one of those “Chevy” occasions.

’63 Corvette 

This little lady is the a beauty and in great condition. Obviously for the parts we have to source those in unless it’s a generic part, like bulbs etc. It will be a shame to see her go back home as this car drives as well as it looks especially with the roof down in the sun shine and the crackle from the side pipe exhausts. Oh yes!

 

’73 Convertible

The Ford connection is here with this car, the guy who owns this lovely original condition car also worked for the Ford Dagenham plant in London. A seriously well looked after car and pleasure to see them looking this good in the sunshine.

Adams ’73 Convertible

Not to be outdone by the customers topless cars, Adam got his ’73 out for a road trip out, as he would say “it’d be rude not to!” Somewhere in the countryside he stopped to take a few pics, we’re not sure if this was just a picture break or a combined “comfort stop”. Adam was gone a while and had been drinking lots of tea before he left, just sayin’. Nice job of the pics though.

Earlier in the week Adam was trying out his new wheels and tyres combination. He settled for this look, a good choice it was we would say, he is also using his Mustang Maniac red Hub centers to match the car paint, and the white wall for the roof.

WebShop

We had a brand new item in stock is our ’64 to ’69 Mustang trunk sound proof mat. We sold one to Mart with his ”66 Coupe and he kindly sent us some pics of the install for us. We checked with Drake and the Black side does indeed go down on top of the tank. This mat will help protect the fuel tank and mask some noise that resonates from the truck area.

Before fitting you can remove the protective plastic on the black side to help stop the mat slipping around on the tank surface. The Black side has a very slight tack to it but not sticky so can be easily moved around if needed.

The fit of the mat is inside the drop off sections.

With the truck mat refitted and all back in place.

Mart’s verdict of the product;

“A thick sound proof mat like the fire wall sound proofing, a great product as you would expect. Good fit which only took minutes to fit (after I had cleaned the complete trunk area). The good part; is that it has certainly muffled some drone from the trunk area and the top of the tank has a nice protection to it. The bad is that the exhaust is not as loud now 😉 But, if you put sound proofing in that’s what you expect. I’m pleased with it.”

Enjoy the sun, check the radiator fluids, keep the sun cream on and keep an eye on the pets in the heat. This is supposed to be the hottest May Bank Holiday on record. We shall see.

Going Loco In Acapulco

For once we can say that the weather has bought out the cars and its great to see them on the road. It makes a change from us saying a couple of months back drive carefully in snow and ice. Speaking of driving carefully brings us onto our Park & Pic this week;

Park & Pic

Our friend and loyal customer Mart D. has finally got his car out the garage to get it M.O.T’ed with us. We know that the car’s MOT had run out in early December last year and has been SORN (Statutory Off Road Notification). In the mean time his car has been wrapped in cotton wool in the heated and dehumidified garage of his. Mart and his OCD issues wouldn’t allow him to bring it out in the rain just in case it shrunk apparently! Still it’s nice to see his ’66 Coupe in Acapulco blue in the sun, it’s just we are not on holiday in the real Acapulco, Mexico. We have done an extensive guide of the full restoration of his car from being a real mess of a shell, to being at the NEC Classic Car Show some four years later when it was finished. Click here for the link to see all the work. It’s a very large page so give ita few moments to load.

The car had a time slot with our MOT guys, trouble was that Mart would be driving it there. Let’s just say that he is worse than useless with directions, he has even got lost with a Sat-Nav (honestly). All of this is being said with Marts knowledge and he will be the first to admit it as well. 😀 Anyway we gave him the Sat-Nav details, we gave him verbal description on how to get there from both Adam and Morgan. With that he set off at about quarter to eleven for the fifteen minute journey. Just as he was leaving Yogi sent him a message to remind him that the MOT centre shuts at three pm on a saturday, therefore he would need to get a move on. 😀  Anyway twenty-five minutes later we got the text to say he had found it and was feeling very proud of himself! Apparently he had driven carefully watching “The other nutters on the road who were intent on trying to mash my motor up.” Again, those we only printable words we could use on a family blog.

A little while later the car had passed with flying colours and he was on the way back to us. There was a tiniest leak from the water thermostat housing that needed a little tighten up. Mart got stressed about it as he had to clean that part of the engine (again). This is fairly common as the chrome housings can go slightly out of shape causing a tiny drip now and again, which only needs a little tighten up to reseal again.

Customer Cars

The Gold Convertible has been for the initial road test and things didn’t go to plan. Yogi took her round the usual route, country lanes for handling, dual carriageway for a cruising test and round abouts and junctions for brakes.

The car was tuned to default and the road tes started. Once the car got onto the main dual carriageway there was the dreaded drone and an increasing wobble on the steering. Front wheel bearing had decided to implode. Yogi being on the ball pulled over immediately and stopped and noticed the smoke from the hub of the wheel. As LAR headquarters were only a couple of miles away now a recovery was required to prevent more damage. The car was put straight back into the Yogi cave where the strip down started to get the bearing off and this is what was left after the race and bearing had destroyed each other. Not the nice neat unit you would expect. Although it was all greased you just need one rod to fracture and it will take everything with it. Not every single road test goes to plan, That why we do them – to make sure we are happy with it before we hand it over. The good part is that it happened to us and we managed to not damage the spindles as we knew what was going on. This could have happened at any time and there is no way to predict a bearing failure of this proportion unfortunately.

Now we would have to replace the wheel bearings on both sides and the steering realigned as a result.

The car would then take another road test to check the wheel alignment and make sure all was OK once again.

As the sun was out we put the roof up! Yep UP. That way the warmth of the sun can help stretch the stiff new material into place and help the folded creases to fall out too.

Other News:

Adams new purchase is this little rarity anybody recognise it?

This is one of those rarity gearboxes; a Super T10. We found this information on the gearbox and it’s background and why it’s such a sort after gearbox. We thought we would give you a little techy article post which we found on a Borg Warner Tech spec site;

American car manufacturers had to scramble in the early part of the 1960s to get a four speed transmission for their performance cars. All the money was tied up in automatic transmission tooling and production as a high profit option. The base units ran three speed column shift manuals. The torque laden engines didn’t really need a fourth gear for regular driving. Once speed became important, so did an extra gear and a floor shifter. Detroit made do with the Borg Warner T-85 which was a three speed unit. It was tough and that’s why they used it. The T-85 box was the starting place for the new Borg Warner T-10 four speed.
One of the earliest models to get the four speed was the Corvette. It appeared in 1957 and helped make it a real sports car contender along with the 283 V8. What engineers did was use the T-85 main case and add a reverse gear into the extension housing, making room for fourth gear. The main cases were aluminum on Corvettes. Other Chevrolet cars used cast iron cases until 1962. The T-10 was considered a heavy-duty transmission at the time and was issued with high performances engines of the early 1960s.  You’ll see these behind 283 fuelies, 348s, Pontiac 389s and even Mopars used them until their own unit was ready in late 1963.
The Super T-10:
Competition ended the T-10’s domination in cars. Muncie, Saginaw and New Process all developed their own four speed boxes, each capable of handling high torque and sustained power. By 1965, wide-spread use of the T-10 was easing. Buick held on until 1966 and Corvette remained the sole factory player by 1967. The story doesn’t end there. Drag racing uncovered some weaknesses in the original design and research  efforts by many racers developed new tricks to improve the basic design. This and a selection of different gear clusters kept the T-10 active. A result of all this R&D was the release of the Super T-10 in 1969. This revised transmission had an iron main case instead of aluminum. The gear sets were larger than the originals for added strength  yet were smaller than either Muncie or New Process gears. The Super T-10 gears were 9310 high nickel alloy and were coarse cut for better load capacity. You also got more ratios to pick from.The Super T-10 was sorely needed as muscle cars were very powerful by the end of the decade. More changes were made in production and an aftermarket over the counter version was offered called Power Brute.  You could order new ratios, heavy-duty synchro sleeves and generally improved parts. The GM Super T-10s were about 92 pounds while big car Ford Super T-10s came in around 101 pounds.

Ford used three versions of T-10s in their cars. The light cars used a 2.73:1 low gear, 2.06:1 second and 1.62:1  third gear. As in all other applications fourth gear is direct drive. The big block Galaxie used 2.36:1 low gear, 1.62:1 second gear and 1.76:1 third gear. The third Ford T-10 used 2.36:1 low gear, 1.76:1 second gear and 1.41 for third gear.Mopar T-10s: Chrysler used two different gear sets for their T-10s. The standard set was 2.54:1 for 1st gear, 1,89:1 for second gear and 1.51:1 for third. The close ratio set was 2.20:1 low, 1.64:1 second and 1.31 third gear.

Classic T-10 Mods from the 60s & 70s:
 The aluminum main case is a bit fragile for heavy race use. The gear shafts are prone to flexing under high loads. This is one reason why the Muncie and especially the M22 was preferred equipment and still highly desirable to this day. While Borg Warner didn’t release a high twist gear set like the M22, they did come up with a second revision Super T-10 in 1975. The Super T-10 gear shafts are tougher as they’re made from high nickel content. For a brief period it was the hot set up to install Super T-10 shafts inside an aluminum main case. You saved about 30 pounds but had to go through the expense of modifying case to fit a late-model shaft. Wear rate increased because the nickel shafts could crack the trans shift cover, then your case in that order. This mod was dropped after a few years.  Another more worthwhile tip is using the Ford T-10 shifter arms and shafts. They used a 3/8-inch stud which is thicker than the 5/16 GM shafts.  If your T-10 has the older bearings with non grooved sleeve go for an upgrade. Borg Warner has used the heavy-duty bearings  since 1975. Power Brute aftermarket bearings were available starting in 1972 and have appeared in some production cases. For GM cars, the Buick 27-spline main shaft takes high rpm launch stresses better than Chevrolet main shafts.

We finish with a couple of nice pics where Adam says make sure your dogs have plenty of clean fresh water in this heat, looks like they are enjoying the sun too.

Spring Time Your Way?

Ok so the title is a little play on words for this week’s blog, but the weather in the UK is picking up a little and looking forward to the warm weather and all the classic cars coming out to play. We said a play on words as this weeks Park & Pic is a car we still have with us after a service and a good look over. The ’65 Springtime yellow coupe is owned by our friend and customer Mick.

Park & Pic

The car is solid and the best bit? It’s up for sale! NOw Adam doesn’t “Sell” cars, he will take money for them if somebody has the right amount of cash for it. So this is not a regular feature to sell cars on our little ol’ blog, but if you are interested email us via the WebShop and they will put you in touch with the owner. No tyre kickers obviously.

The car has a great paper trail of the work completed on her over the years and always adds provenance to a classic car.

The engine is a nice little head turner too and runs as well as it looks.

Customer Cars

The Golden convertible has had some attention this week on the interior and has taken some great steps forward. The carpet has been fitted and the seats have gone back in. The dash area and wire pigtail have taken a little work but they are now fitted fine.

The external fittings are starting to come together and it’s amazing how a couple of shiny bits can make a difference.

The Transmission mounts were in a less than desirable condition should we say, and no we can’t use Yogi’s description of the part as this is a family blog! The replacement has been fitted in place and should make a huge difference to the driveability of the car.

Other News

We have been mentioning that we have been finding old “stuff” to share with you, this week is no different. This 1965 advert gives us an interesting insight into the minds of ford and their marketing.

Happy Birthday to….

The Ford Mustang of course, well not just yet, on Tuesday 17th April to be precise where the Mustang will be Fifty Four years old! We owe a big thanks to our good buddy Gary aka “Boris” (don’t ask), for coming up with some great little facts for us;

1) Ford US built 8160 Mustangs up to April 16, the day before launch – enough for one per dealer.

2) Ford planned to increase production through 1964, but due to the reaction at launch built another 16,000 Mustangs for the balance of April 1964.

3) Ford dealers took 22,000 orders at launch and sold well over 400,000 in the first year.

4) Ford had initially planned to sell 150-180,000 Mustang a year.

5) The following generations continued to be successful, but it was considered that the “Fox” bodied cars were somehow less successful. This is not true as they sold more than 400,000 units in the first year beating the original Mustang’s score.

6) The ‘father of Mustang’ Lee Iacocco was fired by Henry Ford 2 much later because of two reasons – he wanted to produce lots of small front wheel drive cars…and it is thought that he was becoming more prominent within Ford than ‘Hank the Deuce’.

7) Henry famously said when pressed by the Board of Directors of Ford on the firing of Iacocca; “sometimes you just don’t like somebody”.

8) The legendary “Bullitt” car now also becomes a member of the coveted “fifty years old club” too.

Classic Cars Excel London 2018

It’s a known fact that Adam doesn’t do big car shows, “been there, done that and got the trophies as Adam would say, but on the odd occasion he will. Last weekend was one of those shows, the Classic Car Show at the London Excel Centre. This show is aimed at people wanting to buy classic cars rather than the trade style shows on how to restore them. The cars were all glistening and tip-top looking, in fact some were better than when they came out the factory. Adam took his much-loved KR to the show and was along side a few other great cars at the Mustang Owners Club of GB all weekend.

There was the usual interest in the car and somebody even argued that Carroll Shelby signed the name wrong on the glove box. It was explained that the signature was Cleo’s, unfortunately the little knowledge the gentleman had didn’t extend to Carroll’s wife!

There was a nice collection of Classic and some rare UK Fords:

Some iconic Classic British cars.

There was of course the Classic USA Fords; including a genuine GT350 up for sale with no price tag on show!

There was some Classic Super & Hyper cars, that already have the Classic status.

Check out the price tag for this Ferrari 250, got any spare change?

A section that was created for the show was called the “Getaway Cars” which was to show the most popular and well-known vehicles. We use the term vehicles because the well trusted “Ford Transit” was used in many a “job” at the time along with the legendary Lotus Cortina.

Speaking of Transits there was a specialised coachworks for a beautiful example.

The unusual cars and items for sale were not forgotten.

Perhaps the most iconic automobile that brought affordable travel independance to the masses was the Ford “Model T” which was also named the most influential car of the 20th Century. This car was also the first to be built on the fully moving production lines, changing the face of manufacturing as we know it. By 1918 over HALF the cars in the USA were Model Ts.

The last day Sunday 18th February 2018

During the show the guest of Honour was the ever popular 1992 Formula 1 world Champion & Indy Car World Champion 1993; Nigel (Red 5) Mansell who appeared on the Sunday to receive an achievement award. He drove a Formula 1 car indoors which made plenty of noise should we say, especially when doing donuts and lighting up the rear tyres. He signed autographs and done a couple of question and answer sessions which proved to be very popular and very informative.

His much loved race cars were on display which had a constant wall of people around them.

There was a stand that catered for the rich children with miniature versions of classic cars with petrol engines, maybe not quite the growling 427ci monsters under the hood, but a more modest single cylinder version.

Customers Cars:

Yogi and Paul got to work on the Classic Mustang rust spot; the lower cowl sections. On cars after ’66 they were a little easier to get to, but still need a lot of skill to replace as this also forms a structural part of the car. The thin and rusted through lower section can clearly be seen.

With the cowl removed the inner workings of the car can be seen. Welding the cowl back needs considerable care in order to not scorch or damage the rest of the car under the cowl.

We could bring more about this week, but we think the blog post is full enough, for now at least. Did anybody else go to the show and what were your thoughts?

Bubbling Away

For the last couple of posts we have asked you to send us some pictures of your cars so we can post them for you on our little ol’ blog. We’re pleased to say that you have taken us up on our offer, so please keep them coming. We had an email from Alan Bullock. He sent us a few lines with his pictures:

“I thought I would just tell you that my 1968 302 V8 (4 barrel carburetor) Red RHD Mustang Convertible Is 50 years old today and still looks wonderful. Thank you for you help in the past.”

In fact we like to think that the people who entrust their treasured cars to us have become more than just customers, they’ve also become our friends.

Customers Cars:

At Mustang Maniac we are never afraid to show the quality of our work and how we go about it all. Obviously we don’t show every single one of our little secrets, but we do show a lot of the processes. That way you know exactly what you are paying for. Last week we posted a repair of some rear quarter panels that had started to rust from the inside out. We received an email on what that would look like. We took some photo’s before hand of the metal worm in progress. A little bubble under the paint will often reveal a lot more than you expect.

Golden Convertible.

We showed a number of months ago the work starting on a restoration on a gold convertible, that work has started up again and we are working on the inside now.

Car Shows:

We have a car at “The London Classic Car Show” in the Excel Centre. Adam loaned a car to the Mustang Owners Club stand, his much-loved Shelby KR. This is a picture of the car before the crowds all started to arrive on the Thursday this week. We will bring you some more pictures of the show. Pop along to Mustang Owners Club of GB to say “Hi” and that the Mustang Maniac blog sent you along. The guys will appreciate it.

A Chilly Work Of Art:

We had this link sent to us and we thought that we would share it with you, especially if the weather is snowing where you are:

A Ford employee and Dearborn resident Jacob DiMaria’s creative snow sculpture isn’t your average snowman. 

 His creation – a 1965 Ford Mustang – took about 10 hours to construct Sunday and Monday after a big snowstorm in Metro Detroit. The sculpture is drawing lots of attention from his neighborhood, as well as from the Detroit Free Press and Channel 4 News. Reporters came out to his house to see the creation for themselves, and interview DiMaria and his wife Lizzie.

DiMaria said he and his siblings often made snow creations when they were kids and never really grew out of it. He built a little snow dog a few weeks ago on his back deck, but it was when his brother made a bear that he felt he had to step up his work. And so he turned to the Mustang. “I’ve always liked the ‘65 Mustang, plus the body lines were relatively easy to sculpt in snow,” he said. DiMaria, a technologist who has worked for Ford since July 2014, said his co-workers have gotten in on the fun, too, making many jokes. If it’s any reassurance to the design employees: DiMaria acknowledged that the car’s proportions are a little off – but it’s close. “It’s not perfect but it’s what it is,” he told the Free Press.

Mustang Manaic thinks that it’s pretty amazing, now who was it that said you can’t have fun in the snow?

Not us!