A Mix Of Old And New

This week we have little of the old and new and both mixed together. We shall start with the ever popular and current topic “John Wick” car. The trailer for John Wick 2 has surfaced and has only increased the awareness of this great car as the views for the car our blog has been quite impressive. There is still plenty to do on her yet and so far so good.

Yogi has improved the handling of the car rear end for launching of the line with a pair of traction bars to the axle.

Then with the wheels being rolled from the build shop to the geo workshop Yogi set up the geometry ready for a road test when we get round to it that is once the inside a little more complete. After the road test we will check the settings to make sure everything has settled down correctly then we will put smome more miles on her to check the engine setup and brakes etc.

With that all completed and Yogi heard mutterings of words that would need a translator for us mere mortals to understand, things like “Camber, Caster, Toe, shock travel adjustments, spring rates” etc. We rolled the car out and took a few photo’s of the new preliminary stance set up.



The interior now has the seats in place and Dynamat for the doors. Dash area still needs work as does the trim levels of course.


We are even trying to source a window tag that was seen in the film just to add a little more realism.

We are looking forward to the first road test of this little lady to see how many admiring glances she gets!

Article: Mustang conquers the world

We were sent this information which we hadn’t picked up on all about the new Mustang sales progress so far. We’re not to sure how old it is, but it’s still relevant and only gets better with strong sales everywhere.

A globetrotting hit, from Europe to mideast to Australia


A U.S.-built Mustang is loaded on a freighter headed overseas.

Customers in England and Australia face backlogs of at least six months for a new Ford Mustang. In Germany, the Mustang has attracted more retail buyers this year than the home-country favourites Audi TT and Porsche 911.

And in the U.S., the Mustang is not just beating, but downright pummeling, the redesigned Chevrolet Camaro en route to a second consecutive title as the nation’s top-selling sports car.

Ford Motor Co.’s 2014 overhaul of the Mustang, which included opening sales in 81 more countries to turn it into a global halo for the automaker, is paying off. Demand has been especially heavy for the first-ever right-hand-drive Mustang, which went on sale late last year in 25 markets where the car had been virtually off-limits previously.

Ford said it has sold about 27,000 right-hand- drive Mustangs since production started a year ago.

“Mustang has been a huge success for us,” Colin Massey, general sales manager at Jennings Ford Middlesbrough in northeastern England, said in an email. “We are still seeing a steady demand for the Mustang and are currently averaging between three and four orders per week.”

Ford has a backlog of seven months for the Mustang with a four-cylinder EcoBoost engine and nine months for the V-8 version, Massey said. The wait has been up to 10 months in Australia, where the Mustang is now Ford’s second-biggest seller, behind the Ranger pickup.

“We are always trying to eke out one more right-hand-drive unit if we can,” said Carl Widmann, the Mustang’s chief engineer. “We’ve exceeded expectations overall. We’re getting happy customers across a lot of different regions.”

Ford has sold more than 20,000 Mustangs in Europe, including about 4,400 in the United Kingdom and nearly 6,000 in Germany, since shipments there began nearly a year ago. Ford said it’s the most popular car in the U.K. that’s rated at more than 250 hp. The Mustang is the top-selling sports car this year in Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and South Africa as well, Ford said.
Ford says it has sold about 27,000 right-hand-drive Mustangs since output began a year ago.
Taking on the Germans

The Mustang is Germany’s top-selling sports car this year among retail buyers, according to government data, and it was the overall sales leader in February and March. About one in three German sales are the convertible, and most buyers there choose the 5.0-liter V-8 engine, Ford said, in contrast to the rising popularity of the car’s V-6 in the U.S. and despite much higher gasoline prices there.

“That unmistakable V-8 warble is a hot commodity outside the U.S.,” Ford sales analyst Erich Merkle said in a statement.

Sales have topped 3,300 in Australia and 3,800 in China, a Ford spokesman said.

Before last year, the Mustang was sold in North America and a few dozen other countries, where sales were minuscule. Getting it anywhere else meant working through private importers and, if necessary, making a costly conversion to right-hand drive.

The latest generation was designed to have more global appeal, with more European styling and an independent rear suspension instead of a live axle, a change that upset some traditionalists.

Today, overseas markets still account for a small fraction of the Mustang’s total sales, with about 80 percent of the cars — all built in Flat Rock, Mich. — staying stateside. But Ford sees the Mustang’s growing presence in more than 100 countries outside North America as a way to evangelize its brand to consumers worldwide.

“The visceral look, sound and performance of Mustang resonates with people, even if they’ve never driven one,” Ford’s global product development chief, Raj Nair, said in 2014, when the car marked its 50th anniversary. “Mustang is definitely more than just a car — it is the heart and soul of Ford.”

Huge lead in U.S.

While the Mustang finds its footing in new markets overseas, it’s blowing away the competition in the U.S. It overtook the Camaro last year for the first time since 2009 and hasn’t looked back, even as Chevy rolled out the sixth generation last fall.

The Mustang’s share of the midsize sports-car segment, which also includes the Dodge Challenger, has surged from 37 percent in 2014 to 46 percent so far this year.

Through August, the Mustang leads the Camaro in the U.S. by nearly 33,000 units, a margin so large it might stand up even if Ford took the rest of the year off. Mustang sales here are down 6.8 percent, to 80,829, mirroring a downturn in car sales overall, but the Camaro’s decline is more than twice as steep.

Incentives are part of that difference; Ford increased Mustang incentives by about $500 this year, to $1,535 through July, while Chevy reduced Camaro discounts by about the same amount, to $2,246, according to Autodata.

In addition, Chevy deliberately moved the Camaro more upmarket with the latest generation, discontinuing the base LS trim. The sticker price for the Camaro now starts at $1,755 more than the base Mustang. Chevy also is selling fewer than 10 percent of the cars to fleet buyers.

“For us, it’s about the right volume,” said Todd Christensen, GM’s marketing manager for the Camaro. “Would we like to be the sales leader? Yes, but not at the detriment of other things.”

DeAgostini Shelby GT500 1:8th Model

A mixture of the old and new now with a new model build of a classic old car. Everything we have built so far for this model can be found on the main heading menu or click here for the hyper link. These issues we see a little more complex build of the front suspension. We will need to retrieve the previously held together front wheels and fit them to the front of the car. Now we have a rolling chassis as it were, but all be it a model 1:8th the size of the real thing.

This post covers issues are forty to forty-four and we are a few issues in front of the official build diary itself.


Part 41:

This centres around the front suspension lower control arms and sway bar. The main part is a large piece and is screwed into place on a number of places. Not a lot of parts, but a little time to fit them all together.


Lower control arms have the press in pins which will need a pair of pliers, we also prefer to press the pin is from each side protecting the frame with a small piece of card torn from the packaging.

The previously built front wheels and steering are used now to screw to the control arms. The chassis will need to be flipped over and back a few times. The only tricky part here is steering ram on the chassis to be connected with the steering on the wheels.


Part 42

This issue centres around the top control arms holding the wheels in place. The parts again need to have the pivoting pin pressed into place with pliers.

The single screw will hold the control arm to the wheel and should now move up and down with the car. Two screws for each side of the frame rails and need to be fitted uniquely for each side.


Part 43

This is the exhausts running from the rear up to the front section now. There are the main pipe and the other half of each muffler to be to be screwed together, they can only fit together one way. We found that the rear pipes that go over the rear axle have a cut out where the exhausts fit into. We noticed that our was a little out of shape and needed a very gentle bend to get the ends to seat correctly. If you do bend be careful not to break or snap them.


The exhausts are held in place by four screws on the inner side of the floor pans.


Part 44

This sees the first part of the interior to be fitted, apart from the door cards that is. The front carpets if you like and the gear shift. This is a single screw from the underside of the carpet. The black section is a superb black made of a velour style material.

This part is not attached to the floor pan itself yet but you can see where it will fit though.


Custom Engine Build

We have had a special request to build a custom “Stroked” engine for a good customer of ours. The valve covers are just there to keep it clean as the proper ones will be going on at a later date.

Only two more week to go now to the SEMA show, we are trying to get things wrapped up as much as we can while we temporarily take a break to see whats new in the world at Las Vegas. We’re not saying we are excited or anything, but we have put a countdown marker on the page too, can you spot it?


Turning Up The Wick

This week we get straight back to the popular John Wick build and as the old saying goes, we “turned up the wick” and moved her on leaps and bounds. We have pretty much finished the outside now with the front lights being fitted, badges and the rear spoiler added.


The engine is now being built up with the air filter now decided and fitted which really suits the car, the sparkling new radiator and grill plate complete the look retro look. The steering has been upgraded to the brilliant Borgeson power system which makes a huge difference to the directional control.


The interior has had the custom made rear shelf and rear seat fitted. To complete the movie car look we have the wooden steering wheel for that quality feel.

The front interior takes more work obviously to fit in the upper dash to complete the wiring installation. The front seat will be one of the last things to go in so we have room to work. All of a sudden the John Wick car is coming together very quickly.

Customer Cars

We had a poorly sounding car arrive for our attention on a ’68. The old engine had no compression which could be for a number of reasons. We have said many times before, the cost of a rebuild is more than a straight forward crate replacement. This was the case on this little lady where a new 302 was prepped on the stand before being installed into the car.


Our Cars:

Yogi has decided that it’s time his super fast Mach1 got some of that attention our customer cars get. He has decided to de-trim the car and take some of the insides out. We are not sure what he is up to yet, but we are looking forward to seeing what he does with her. Yogi has turned down a very kind, but cheap offer from Lob Monster to buy his engine as “its second hand now!” As this is a family blog we couldn’t possibly repeat the response, it did resemble something that Chewbaccha would have growled.

Other News:

There is the annual trip to the USA for the SEMA show 2016 which we are all seriously looking forward too. There will be quite a few of us going this year and it could be that Mustang Maniac will shut for a week or so. The blog may well have to wait for any updates until we get back, depending on how it goes while we are all there. More updates nearer the time; Flights – check, Accommodation – check, passports & ESTA – check, minimal clothes and lots of empty space in the suit case to bring back stuff – check!

SEMA logo

The Flying Bathtub

We have said before that here at Mustang Maniac we get many requests to look at unusual cars if they are good customers. This time a customer has asked us to look at his car which is called the “Flying Bathtub”. The car itself is based on the Reliant Kitten, chassis, engine and transmission. The Wheels are from an Austin 7.


The engine had some serious problems due a to piston ring disintegrating itself damaging the chamber. The cost to rebuild the engine outweighs the cost of a replacement, so we have swapped the engines over.


Yogi was constantly heard to be growling “Where is the rest of the engine?”🙂 Seriously though, we had to set up the valves and timing in order to make it run properly, then it’s off for a proper road test when the weather is dry.

The car is a fun little thing and draws a few glances. Not quite our usual five litre or more cars, more like 850cc or 51ci (for our friends across the pond), producing a 40bhp which is enough to push this all aluminium shell down the road.

Adam said he would even take a friend with him on the road test!


Adam’s Question:

“What’s the difference between men and boys”?


“Men have bigger toys”!

Adam has bought his biggest truck yet over from the States. The rumour has been rife with the potential name for this beast of a truck. Somebody who shall remain nameless (yep, it was Yogi), started the rumour off that the truck was going to be called “Yogi”. Apparently the reason is that it’s yellow, like Yellow Stone Park where Yogi lives and and it’s big! Nothing to do with it being bad ass truck and sound likes an angry bear being branded on its back side then! Adam did say that “people tend to get out the way when they see this coming”. We thought that was an under statement.🙂


Customer Cars:

A little more work on the John Wick car adding some nice touches to the engine. She started up spot on and sounds awesome as you would expect. The new carb is now in place and set up in the garage. We will need to put a few miles on her and tweak with final adjustments when the engine is under load. We have also added a heater matrix isolation valve, rocker covers and engine pip[e work. We are very pleased with the car so far.


One Off – In The Bin

An expensive lesson can be learned when you here the words “One Off, bespoke, handcrafted, stainless steel exhaust system”. Most of the time this is music to a classic car owners ears. But, in this case the exhaust was indeed a one-off. The car was picked up and the owner knew something was wrong straight away. The car was making a horrible noise and pretty undriveable since the exhaust was fitted. The exhaust was taken to another place to be sorted and it was improved, but again it was still not right. The car was eventually brought into our workshops where we had a look at it and found the problem. Not the material itself, but the quality of workmanship and maybe a lack of understanding. So we cut it off and threw it away as it couldn’t be salvaged.

The mufflers were not a well know brand and looked similar to a very well-known brand should we say. The exhaust was made of many sections as you would expect and welded together, not very well. The mounting of the exhaust was the serious problem to start with. A right-angled bracket was welded to the rear of the chassis and a corresponding right angle was then welded to the exhaust. Now you should always hang an exhaust on straps or rubber to allow the exhaust to move with the engine and any resonance would be dispersed from the exhaust. This hand crafted exhaust was then unbelievably welded bracket to bracket at the rear. A “one off” alright, we haven’t seen that before.


No wonder the noise was bad and that didn’t include the poor exhaust note either. To rectify the problem we could make another stainless system again and do it properly, or get a Scott Drake Flowmaster system from stock and bolt it all on with the correct brackets and hangers. We did the later as requested and here we have a full sequence of pics of another new exhaust fitted, correctly this time from front to back.

The car now sounds like a Mustang should and drives as expected. So next time you hear the words “One Off, bespoke, handcrafted, stainless steel exhaust system”, ask yourself who will be fitting it! It’s all in the detail and knowing how to fit it properly.

We didn’t get to post last week as Mustang Maniac and Friends were out to a Classic Car Show simply known as “A602 Autorama” in Stevenage. The weather was not to bad with the odd few rays of sun shine but the rain held off which is the main thing at all these shows. It was up early for some of us, no names mentioned who that was though Lance! As always there were lots of nice cars there so we thought we would focus on the Mustangs.

It was a good show and some very nice cars there, far to many to take up space on a Mustang post.😉

Customer Cars:

John Wick is proving to be the popular car and questions about the build from visitors. Over the coming week we hope to fill with fluids and fire her up. This will check the electrics out, and the fact the engine will run. Fine tuning will come later after a road test or three. The glass is all in now and has taken time to set them up correctly.


What do you do with old doors that have gone rusty?


Answer: You make a sign out of them of course.

A Classic Mustang From New

A couple of posts ago we mentioned that we had a special article to appear soon regarding buying a brand new ’65 Mustang from a dealership. Well, we now have that interview’s transcript for you. Here is a rare and incredible story that spans over some 50 years for a one owner Mustang from new. The owner of this Mustang bought the car new from a Ford Dealership Nelson Hirschberg Inc. in Chicago. His name is David, we shall refer to him as DL for his side of the story. This is a fascinating insight to all those years ago.

Background is that DL is an architect by trade and was working temporarily over in the USA during 1965.

MM: how did you come to the decision to buy a Mustang?

DL: I was living in Chicago at the time and I was working on the 8th floor of the building. When you looked out the window there was a vacant plot which was being used as a car park. Around June 1965 there some guy who must have been working in a block nearby who had just bought a brand new 2 + 2 Fastback. I could see his car park there every day, I thought that’s a rather nice car, I wouldn’t mind having one of those. So a couple of months later I bought one.

MM: What was it like going into the showroom to buy one? Were they falling over themselves to sell you the car or did they just say; do you want it or not? How did it work?

DL: I was talking it over with a colleague at work that we were thinking of buying a Mustang. He recommended this Ford dealership up in North Chicago. We drove there and asked for a test drive. I said, We will have one of these. He said OK, what colour do you want? I decided that I wanted a dark metallic blue and also decided to go for a small engine, just he straight 6 as we were going to bring the car back here (UK). So I thought for the English roads, bearing in mind the only motorway that was open was the M1 I think, and this was way before the M25 was built. So for the English roads I didn’t need a whacking great v8 engine, so I settled for the 3 ¼ litre i6.

MM: So when you were in the dealership, did they give you a book with all the options in it to choose from?

DL: I said that I wanted a dark blue fastback 2+2 with automatic transmission; we also had white wall tyres option on the original 13” wheels for the first 3 or 4 years. They didn’t have a car in stock I wanted, so they checked with the other 10 or so dealers in Chicago where they found one. So two or three days later it was ready. Back then we were driving and old ’55 Chevy which we drove there left it with them and drove away in the Mustang. I cost me $2,800, which in those days was a fixed rate conversion of $2.8 to the £1, so that Mustang cost me £1,000.

MM: £1,000?

DL: Yes £1,000.

MM: When you went to pick the keys up did they make a big fan fare out of it for you, or didn’t they care as they (Mustangs) were selling well?

DL: They were a big Ford dealership at the time who was selling half a dozen cars a day. As far as they were concerned I was just another customer.

DL seen with is much-loved car he has had from new.


DL’s Original sales document and the matching door tag for the car.


Then roughly 12 months after we bought the car (1966), we came back via ocean liner. They put the car in the hold of the ship by a big crane with a cradle and lowered it into the hold of the ship. It wasn’t a drive on / drive off then. It was quite a new ship, the SS France.


Our first port of call was going to be my wife’s parents in Germany, so we got off at Le Havre in France where the ship terminated. We arrived quite late at night if I remember rightly. The process to unload the car was then done in reverse, they craned the car out of the ship’s hold onto the dock side for us. We had two small children in those days. In the 2+2 the back seats fold down to give a little platform. When the children were small, we just used to put a couple a pillows there (the rear shelf platform) and a blanket for them to go to sleep on. This was before the requirement of seat belts and so on of course. We just travelled around the country side like that.

MM: That’s just amazing.

DL: Since the car has been here in the UK it has been garaged for all of its 50 years. In fact I have done over 200,000 miles in that car. I only sold it a couple of weeks ago in fact. As I have retired I was only doing 300 or 400 hundred miles a year in it which only came out high days and holidays sort of thing. It seemed a shame to keep it in a garage and hardly use it.  So I thought it was time to sell it and move on. In fact I sold it to the guy who done some body work on it for me 20 years ago where the original wheel arches had rusted. At that time we did it up fixed the wheel arches and gave it a complete respray. I should imagine he will do it up and sell it on now.

MM: Can you tell us about how you got to go to the World Fair 1965?


DL:  We flew from Chicago to New York to go to the World Fair in 1965 which was a really big event. There were all these fancy pavilions, English, French, Italian countries and so on, Ford, General Motors pavilions, and we spend the whole day there.

Thinking about it our daughter had her first birthday while we were there in New York. At the event you could hire these little push cars with handles on them for the little ones, so we pushed her around in that, it was more of a day out for us.

MM: What was the Ford stand like?

DL: I said to my wife lets pop in where they had lots of new shiny Mustangs on show.  We told them that we had just bought a Mustang a couple of weeks ago. They said to us hang on a minute; I gave them my state registration number and they gave us a little tag with our reg plate on which went on your key ring. In fact it was still on the key-ring when I gave Adam the keys to the car, it has been on there for 50 years, the wording has rubbed of a bit now though. They tapped it all out in a couple of minutes while I waited.

This isn’t DL’s actual tag, but one very similar.

MM: So your car has been over here ever since 1966?

DL: Yes all that time, in fact I used it to drive to work and back every day.

MM: Really?

DL: Yes

MM: How did you get on with servicing it while it was over here?

DL: I think it was Dagenham motors who had a base in Wembley where it took it for the first few years for a service. In recent years it was taken to a guy who specialises in American cars, so he would do anything needed at the time, they have closed down now though. For the first few years it didn’t really need anything. The first thing after 10 years to go was the gearbox. There was a place in Welling Garden City at the time with a couple of guys in their 50’s, they just specialised in automatic gearboxes. They put in a new gearbox for me and it’s been going perfectly ever since. Again they are not there anymore.

MM: Was it was a straight replacement?

DL: Yes, it still works fine. The only problem I have had in recent years after they put in the new gear box for me 40 years ago is that the seals have gone a bit and leaks transmission fluid. I have a drip tray in the garage and it would leak, only a couple of tablespoons of fluid every couple of months. So every couple of months I had to top it up. So in recent years it cost me about £9 or £10 year in transmission fluid. That is a fairly low-cost compared to putting in a new gearbox. The last few years I have been thinking about selling the car so I haven’t replaced the gearbox.

MM: impressive and not bad at all

DL: Well that’s about it.

MM: Absolutely fantastic, and thank you very much for sharing your story with us.

We would like to say a big thanks to David for spending time with us and sharing his unique story.

Customer’s Cars

John Wick car has started to look like a car now. It’s funny but as soon as glass starts to go in the car it looks so different. The front screen, rear screen and the right side glass has been fitted and aligned up now.

The front end has started to have some of trim added and the rear trunk is now locking via the key.

Mach1 rebuild:

We have also taken some time with the owner of the car to strip out the steering and suspension for the car. This will give us an idea of the wear on the components and allow for a proper spray job on the car. Some of the bolts were a bent over in places and would not allow the nuts to be undone easily. To work round this the hubs and brakes all came of in one large piece each side. In all the excitement we forgot to take any pics of the “in progress” shots we like to do as it were. But as a lot of it was very dirty work and messy that was sort of the last thing on the mind at the time. A comment was made about who was taking the pictures, a large tumble weed rolled by the front of the car at this point! So we took some pictures of the disassembled parts to make up for it.

During the clean up of the shock tower areas under the upper control arms it was full of years worth of dirt and grime. When it was cleaned of we could see that the car has had some damage in the past and the bottom of the shock tower has been repaired with a seam welded plate.

The front chassis leg on the right hand side has seen better days and will need a new section in place. Like all these things – we have seen a lot worse.

The inner section of the engine bay is not to bad at all on first inspection. Once it has been cleaned up we will check it thickness and make sure it’s all OK.

The top of the inner wings are shot and will need replacing as well as the cowl to inner wing plates.


The upper control arms need replacing and the engine mounts themselves. We will take a close at the rest and especially the steering. The owner is not sure at the moment if the steering will be a rack & pinion Borgeson set up yet.

Shelby GT500 1:8th Model

As the weather was so nice we sat outside and built the latest four issues numbers thirty-seven to forty.


Part 37

Simple case of adding the front chassis to the middle section. 4 screws and job done. This gives us the first indication of the length of the model. The second pic here shows a corresponding magazine laying next to the model. It’s going to be approx two A4 magazines long to put it simply.

Part 38

These couple of parts are the first upward build of the base chassis. again very quick with only four screws.

Part 39 

This is the first part of the steering to be assembled. Once it has been completed the two front wheels will be attached to each other. The metal steering parts are held together by a couple of screws, but should be able to be moved so don’t over tighten them.

The steering has a few left/right side bespoke parts, these will be attached to the wheels from the earlier issues and will now need to be retrieved from storage. Again these parts will need to move so no over tightening.


Part 40

Part chassis and part steering with this issue. The chassis has a couple mounting brackets which are screwed to the chassis which are generic to either side. The other part fits on the chassis in only one place.

Back to the steering again with the wheels, the remaining part of this will screw into the middle section of the steering. We found that the screw hole was a real tight here and had to have a couple of attempts to try to get the screw seated correctly. Perhaps a little paint got into the hole.

Now we have almost the full length of the model you can see how we store ours ready for the next part of the build.

For the rest of the build click the menu above, click here or past this link to your browser.



With all the projects on the go at the moment we are really leaving the WebShop to the office team. When Adam is back in the country he is also working on the cars. So we must stress again that we get calls asking if something is in stock; honestly, if the WebShop says in stock then it is in stock. We have also upped our game considerably to make the process as slick as possible for our customers. If you order by noon on a work day, then the parts are picked, packed and posted the same day so you should receive your parts the next day. If you order after that cut off point, then it will be a day later unless you want to pay the extra for the express postage which we can do for you.

With the hot weather looming again this week, we hope to enjoy the sun during a well-earned tea break, if we can that is.🙂

Building Blocks

We have had a couple of phone calls this week (from the same customer) at Mustang Maniac on how to do something once they had purchased the parts. Unfortunately, we simply just don’t have the time to walk somebody through a process over the phone and more often than not, when we try to explain this the customer sometimes takes offence! We were asked a how to change the wiper arms on a ’66 Coupe, so we thought that we could do a very quick guide to save the phone calls in the future, but we will come to that a little later in this post.

Customer Car:

Yep, the popular John Wick car has taken the imagination of customers. When we show some customers around the workshops or the yard they ask to see the John Wick car now. We are pleased that the car is proving to be popular. This week we have been focusing on the exhaust, fitting the marker lights, front lights, setting up the LED rear lights and the rest of the engine wiring. The owner of the car has even bought the number plates down for us to put on the car, even though she is not finished yet. How could we refuse.🙂 The exhaust has been custom fitted with the Flowmaster exhaust boxes which will give this lady a real bark when she starts up and help the performance too.


Yes you did read that right. A little while ago at Mustang Maniac secret workshop (Adam’s office actually), we build a Ford Licensed Mustang, but it was on a small-scale.

To celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Mustang Club of America, Lego’s Master Builders have built a full-scale 1964½ Mustang at its Enfield, CT facility. The Lego car will go on permanent display at Lego’s “Legoland” Florida resort in Winter Haven, FL later this year after touring the USA. This Mustang made of bricks has been nicknamed the Brick Pony. Just like Lego building blocks, (see what we did there), Ford kept building on the success of the Mustang which was expected to sell well, but not as well as it did; original sales forecasts projected less than 100,000 units for the first year. This target was soon smashed after three months from roll out. Another 318,000 would be sold during the model year, and in its first eighteen months, more than one million Mustangs were built. A record that still stands to this day!


We wonder how many actual bricks are in this Mustang? The Mustang weighs in at 1712 pounds of which 960 pounds are Lego bricks (and the larger Duplo bricks), the aluminium chassis takes up the remaining 752 pounds. This car has a chassis believe it or not. The detail on this car is pretty amazing, the headlights and tail lights work, and they have even rigged the model to sound a horn and play the engine sounds. The degree of care can be seen just by looking at the Mustang Coral and grill.


 How To…

We mentioned at the beginning of the blog that we get asked how to do lots of things on the cars. The most recent a number of calls for the same thing, we decided to do a guide or “How To” page which can be found here,  or go to the “How To Projects” menu on the home page.

This really is a simple job, not just on a Classic Mustang, but on most cars. The process should only take a couple of minutes to do with the correct tool. The basic principle is that the spindle from the wiper motor has vertical splines (or location lugs) which are matched by the wiper arm. On the more modern cars the arms are also held in place with a screw, bolt or nut of some description covered by a cap. With the fastener removed the same process could be applied here. The very nature of the part it will usually be corroded to some degree and be difficult to remove. Some of the later cars will need a wiper arm puller if it’s corroded on that bad. We recommend a squirt of Gibbs if this is the case to start with.


For a Mustang the tool is simply a cut out reversed set of long-handled pliers. This tool is not very expensive, wont slip and protects your paint work. The underside has a been coated with a rubber for non-slip and to protect the paint.



Note: Always make sure that the wiper arms are in the correct resting or “park” position before removing and fitting new arms.

We have seen this being done with a screw driver in the past to devastating result. The screwdriver slips and goes across your paint job. Slip the pliers under the base of the wiper arm and squeeze the handles together.


The pliers force will force the wiper arm upwards leaving your other hand to catch the arm should it suddenly ping off and stop it damaging the paint work.


Here is a slightly corroded spindle and damaged splines.


Here is what is should look like before fitting a new one.


With the arm off clean the spline if you need to.

Align the arm where it needs to be fitted and simply press the new arms in place and it’s a job done. Simple as that.


Let us know if there is a specific quick walk through guide you would like to see.

Small Is Beautiful

We have some big updates on Customer Cars this week, business related news for Mustang Maniac and news of new products for later Mustangs. A kind and loyal customer has donated something pretty special Mustang Maniac History Collection, that’s just been made up as this post is being prepared.🙂

The John Wick Car

We posted a little while ago how the floor pans were covered in sound proofing sheets, now we have taken another huge step forward. The rest of the car that needed to be sound proofed has been done ie. the wheel arches, these are always difficult due to the angles and shapes involved.


While the windows are out the head liner has to be fitted, Yogi got busy and spent a day fitting it and the rest of the evening getting the glue out of his fur, he told us the glue had made the cup of tea permanently stick to his hand! We are not so sure on that one.😉

Next up was the wiring, the kit comes with everything needed to wire the car back up with a new fuse box, relays and accessories. We managed to salvage some of the original under dash loom once we had checked it was all OK and we were happy with it. The lower dash was then fitted and looms run out to the engine bay. With everything out-of-the-way it makes life so much easier to complete the intricate jobs.

The trouble is you can spend a complete day doing things like this and it looks like you have done nothing. The secret is all the small steps and preparation, such as where the cables are going to run, what else need to be attached with the loom, where the looms will run to and from etc.

Here are some before and after shots of loom work. This kit requires a 1-wire alternator, but with our know how we can wire these kits up safely with a standard alternator. This doesn’t look like much, but the work involved to remove or add some wires and re-crimp into the original fittings is a dark art. The solenoid is almost ready for the final connections and the loom to be wrapped with our own loom tape for that authentic stock look.

With most of the climbing around inside the car done we could fit the carpets. Again this looks like just throwing in the pre-cut  carpets in place, but you have to trim and create the fitting.

The rear of the car has been completely wired up now and the fuel tank has been fitted in place. The outside of the car has seen the new handles fitted so we can open and shut the doors properly now.

The brakes are all in place now, bleed and the special Yogi treatment performed on the brake lines.

Did You know?

Each car’s brake lines that Yogi has to fabricate are subtly unique, that’s just how Yogi likes it apparently, works of art so he says! Unless you want the standard routing of course which he will do for you too.


Golden Convertible:

This lady has been into us for some serious pampering as only we know how. The car need a whole heap of work doing to her as she was a little tired. The work consisted of a new C4 transmission, rear shocks, leaf springs shackles and bushes. At the front we are going to further improve the handling with new shocks, spring perches and rubber bushes. With the new transmission in place we could fit the new exhaust, boxes and re align it all back up again.

Once all the work is done there will be plenty of life left in her yet and she will feel like the new car again.

Mustang Maniac History Collection

We have been donated some rare Corgi made Mustang toys which are always welcomed.

The second part of the donation is something very special indeed. We had not seen these before let alone actually own one.


These small and beautiful key rings were made during the World Trade Fair in 1964 for the launch of the Mustang. They are no more than an inch wide plus the chain itself.

What we understand is that when you went to the 1964 New York World Fair you could get your car plate made up with its number on a World Fair mini key ring. The cost went as a donation to the US Vets fund. The Disabled American Veterans (DAV) purchased The ident-o-tag company in 1941. License plate key chain tags were used since 1938. The New York based “Lost Key Services” was among the first. There were other advertising tags used too, but you had to order the tags. The DAV was able to get the various state motor vehicle departments to co-operate with them and give them the mailing lists of the people who registered their cars. The DAV mailed tags with your license plate number on them and asked for a donation. The premise was that if you lost your keys, the finder would drop them into a mail box, and the DAV would return them to you. The program continued from 1941 through 1975, and was ended because of a “right to privacy” rule. It’s incredible to have something from that very important World Trade Fair that was actually produced there and also relates to a real person who visited the fair. Special thanks to GW for the information and donations, we seriously appreciate it.

To match all of that, we aim to bring you something very special soon. We have been speaking to somebody who bought their fastback from NEW in 1965 and had it shipped over to the UK in 1966. They still have that same car and all the provenance that went with it. The owner of the car attended the world trade fair in New York itself. We hope to ask some questions with him to bring you a first hand account of that whole Mustang experience.

Mustang Maniac Offices:

The offices at Mustang Maniac always seems to be at the back of the queue when it comes to reliability for our broadband service and telephones. We won’t name them of course, But The name should be easy enough to guess. All the Office ordering, invoices, internet services and telephones are run through the broad band. Yet again we have had an outage where the phones were disabled and we were unable to work. To stop this happening again we have invested in Satellite broadband as a back up. It won’t be brilliant, but at least we can still keep the WebShop working and process your orders. More expense that we shouldn’t have to incur, but if you can’t trust something you have to do something about it.

New Parts

To cater for our customers with the new Mustangs, our suppliers and good friends from USA – Scott Drake are introducing a sale on their new products for the 2015/2016 Mustangs. We haven’t had full details of the costs yet .but we will do very soon. Some of the new parts include:

California Deck Lid Panel for Mustang S550


Aluminum Pedal Covers


550R Aluminum Strut Tower Brace Mustang S550 GT/Ecoboost



AlumaLift Hood Strut System Mustang S550


Billet Parking Brake Handle Cover


Comp Series Fuel Door


LAR Tyre Services: 

The sister company to Mustang Maniac is LAR Traffic Services who have now launched a brand new service to run along side their recovery. That service is a road side tyre service, changing, fitting, inflating, balancing etc. They will be operating to start with in the Essex, Herts and North East London areas. All the details can be found here on their Facebook page:  https://www.facebook.com/lartyres/