An Important Week For The World

Seeing a heading like that you thought we were going to be talking about politics! Nope, something just as important if you are a Petrol Head or Gear Head. We are fully aware that a new President has been sworn into the Oval Office, however we don’t want to be drawn into any mass debates about politics. However all we will say that one of our friends from the USA has sent us something which relates to the occasion. When the dust has settled we may well post the picture, or if we get a request to do so (it can be shown on a family blog, don’t worry) in the mean time. So what will be talking about on this week’s blog that is just as important? Cars, in particular a new model Mustang that’s what. 🙂

News of the 2018 Mustang

Ford would like to focus on the new tech adorning the 2018 Mustang, which includes a huge new information screen and a lot of driver-assistance technology. Mustang enthusiasts are more interested about what’s going on under the hood. Now that Ford had broken the performance barrier with the last-generation Mustang’s new chassis, most of us want to see what’s new in handling as well. This should make pony car fans happy.

2018-mustang1

Under the hood, Ford has simplified the 2018 Mustang’s engine offerings to just two options: the four and an eight-cylinder, both have had their transmissions tweaked that go with each option. The four-cylinder is the already-proven 2.3-ltr EcoBoost engine which showed up in the last generation and as a replacement for the 3.7ltr V6 before it. This iteration of the engine gets a tweak to improve torque output, although Ford has yet to tell everybody just how much that is. We’re also told that the big 5.0-ltr V8 has also been reworked with promises of more power and higher revolutions compared to the previous GT, mainly thanks to a new fuel injection system. The V8 is now a dual-fuel, high-pressure direct-injected engine with low-pressure port fuel injectors. This improvement increases fuel burn through better atomisation in the cylinder bores. The manual transmission has a modified twin-disc clutch through a dual-mass flywheel to increase the torque delivery capability while improving clutch movement. In other words, it makes it more difficult to “burn” the clutch during performance shifting. Pretty standard by most of the cars today to be honest. The automatic transmission now offered for the 2018 Ford Mustang is a new 10-speed tuned to the Mustang’s performance needs. This transmission goes with Ford’s other introductions of high-gear transmissions for performance vehicles like the Raptor pickup truck. Ford is promising faster shift times, better low-speed response rates, and more efficiency with this transmission, which replaces the six-speed automatic offered in the previous Mustang. Steering wheel shift paddles are offered as complements to this automatic transmission.

 2018-mustang5

Underneath the engine is a more refined chassis. The last-generation Mustang saw the advent of an independent rear suspension for the first time in this pony car. Ford has taken that set-up a step further with a new cross-axis joint and improved shock absorbers and sway bars on all models to improve ride and lateral stiffness for the curves. A new option is the “MagneRide” dampers, which allows damper adjustment to further stiffen or loosen the ride quality as the driver wishes. This is expected to be sold as part of the “Performance Package” for the new ponies. Ford also focus on the release of new technology, not just engines. Ford is now offering a 12-inch LCD screen to compliment the dashboard and part of the new instrument cluster. Ford is touting this new screen as the centrepiece that allows the driver to fully customise what’s being shown in the instrument cluster and driver information screens. The driver can also control some of the engine’s sound – or at least how much of it is piped into the cockpit. As with previous generations of the Mustang, the V6 engine’s sound can be created through the speaker system to give it a more robust, muscular track. The GT model has an active valve exhaust system that produces authentic sound that can be controlled by the onboard computer. Driver-assist technology is also at the forefront of this new Mustang. In addition to adaptive cruise control and active braking for crash mitigation, the new models also have options for Pre-Collision Assistant with pedestrian detection, lane-departure warnings, lane-keeping assist, and more.

2018-mustang3

If you ever fall asleep driving a Mustang (which we doubt very much), Ford’s Driver Alert System is now also an option if you are worried about the car being boring. Infotainment which is the latest Ford SYNC Connect is available to the Mustang range for the first time. The is a pretty cool option that allows the Ford Pass smart phone app to access the car remotely for remote start, door lock/unlock, and a lot more.

The most obvious changes are the cosmetic uplifts, offering a more athletic look with a lower hood and updated aerodynamics all of which are a progression from the current model. This does come at the expense of the grille, which is now narrower and more Focus-like than previously seen on the Mustangs. Standard LED lighting all around the car, while the current models rear tail lights remain largely unchanged still giving the nod to the early classic Mustangs.

2018-mustang4

A late announcement as we prepared this article was the new rag top or convertible model. Not much as been mentioned about it apart from the few pics. But, we don’t care its a convertible Mustang!

When do we expect to see this car? we will have to wait until the third quarter of this year! Base models expected to be around £32,000 in the UK.

Customer Cars

Lime ’72 Mach1

The car is being put back together are good speed. The engine was put back into the engine bay and the slow tedious task of wiring back up gets undertaken.

The interior has started to take shape with the dash being fitted up and some of the fittings going back into place.

The underside of the car has now been finished apart from the usual alignment and final tweaks of course. The underside is not as pretty as a full restoration, but the parts are good and there is no need to change them unless they are worn or damaged. The car isn’t going to be put into any concourse shows so Paul is happy to keep it as original as possible. We can’t argue with that either.

We did have to change the oil sump so that has had a little treat of some bling!

mach1painter76

Gulf Stream Aqua’ 65 Coupe

We have an update on the progress of Lances paint damaged car. The paint is coming off and the imperfections slowly being addressed.

Ford Escort Mk1

We have had a very unusual car come into us which is this left hand drive 1973 Ford Escort 1100XL originally built in Germany. The car was fully restored in Serbia with the glass out, new interior, and a full engine rebuild which has only done 50 miles since then. The car has just been MOT’s this week for another year of nostalgic driving. Why do we mention this – ’cause it’s for sale!

DeAgostini Shelby GT500 1:8th Model

The first delivery of 2017 from DeAgostini brings us issues are 57 – 60.

shelby1-8th-152

Part 57:

This issue is a the rear seat back that will screw to the shelf from the last issue. Just press the two parts together and they will snap into place. Tiny screws again for the hinge, but they look good.

the completed shelf seat lays onto the back of the rear section. There is a notch in the lower sides of the rear panels which will take the hinge pin.

Part 58:

This is a duplication of the previous issue Part 53 for the lower side trim.

The tricky part here is to get the rear seat/shelf to stay in place while you screw it together. A downside here is that the plastic has bowed outwards slightly and the tolerance for the hinge pins into the trims means it pops out a few times. We suspect that when it all bolts to the car it will all tighten back up again.

Part 59:

This is a duplicate of the Part 54 for the top rear trim. Getting everything to align while trying to screw it together was a little bit of a mission though.

These pics are of the three positions of the rear seat/shelf being moved.

Part 60:

This issue was a real fiddle with the rear harness belts. The first job is to fit the under dash heater box with two screws.

There are to roller blocks that are mirror images of each other. This image in the magazine was not brilliant but there is a “R” and “L” on each roller if you get stuck. The seat belts have to be threaded into the slots of each roller and the metal part of the hinge lays in place to allow a small screw into the top roll cage fitting. This is repeated for both sides. Depending how OCD you want to be about this, but look at which way the belts will show, specially at the outer side of the belts near the floor.  The could be the lapped over material showing if you get it around the wrong way, will it show? I doubt it, but we made sure the glued section was at the back of the belt and not seen from the front.

The roll cage is clipped into the lower rear trim and a small screw holds it in place. The bottom sections of the of the belts are slotted into the base of the floor section. They recommend to use small pliers or tweezers. We found it easier to get the fitting part of the way through the slots and then gently press it through with a small flat screwdriver. The choice is yours of course. From the other side the metal fastener will clip over a pin to hold it in place. Another down point here. We found that these pins were a little short and didn’t have a nice click into place feel.

We made a decision here to place a tiny drop of super glue onto the pin with the fastener to make sure it stayed in place on all the seat belt anchor points.

shelby1-8th-176

The finished article is pretty good detail but takes a little while to get it all in place.

For the total build so far see the menu above of click here for the hyper link.

See – no politics!

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