Hammer Time

This week we have had a car into us for a conversion and an engine rebuild. Then Adam has had an interesting conversation with a now ex customer who has been awarded the dreaded “C” button. We will get into that little later. It’s well worth a read and you tell us if we are right or wrong!

Customer Cars

This ’68 has come in for a little work on the steering. OK a lot of work on the steering, a swap out to the Borgeson setup.

First it’s out with the old;

Unfortunately, this is as far as we have gotten with it, but it will be finished next week.

On this subject; we have been asked why are we more expensive than others when we fit these kits. The simple answer is – we do it right! When fitting these kits there are a couple of things that need to be done to make them fit properly. Incorrect fitting will damage the “rag joint” and will wreck your set up. We also use upgraded bolts, custom anodised fittings (arrowed), just like in this swap out we done towards the end of last year.

As this was an aircon car it needed a couple of extra bits to make it fit to just look and feel right. We are not going to say what those adjustments are as that is out secret(s) we have developed. The steering column needs to be adjusted otherwise the steering can be pulled up or you run the chance to squash the rag joint. In essence what you are paying for – our experience. You can’t buy it of the shelf, but we have it for hire.

351 Cleveland 4v

we mentioned in a previous post that we had a constantly over heating engine and was smoking like a chimney. We had our UK engineers acid dip it and rebore to 0.30 over with new pistons. The crank was measured and spot on to specs so it was polished and reused. There are also new valve guides and reconditioned heads. The cleaning for these engines is the worse part. We need to make sure the oil and waterways are spotless.

Yogi gets to work with painting and building up the engine in stages.

New water pump, oil pressure, water temp sender, thermostat and housing, bolts and a part that we had made just for us as they are no longer available, the 67 – 70 water bypass tube.

We fitted correct core plugs, new gaskets, harmonic balancer.

The exhaust manifolds have been painted black to match the engine with super high heat resistant paint.

Now we have another engine ready to go into the engine storage shed.

Hammer Time!

Here’s what happened; we we had a company order a set of front discs from us and we shipped them out via our normal services. A few days later we get an email to say they had been damaged or ‘must have been dropped by the delivery’. They wanted a replacement set of discs. Obviously such events are out of our control and these things may happen as they are a heavy bit of kit.

They arrived back at the offices, the box was fine! So we took the package into the dispatch room to investigate further. As we unpacked them there was no damage to the outside of the rotor, very strange.

We flipped the disc over to the inside and there it was, massive damage.

The casting had splitered and cracked off.

What amazed us was the amount of damage was located in the middle area of the disc. Our initial thoughts were that this has indeed been dropped onto a hammer about a dozen times by the looks of the damage. Possibly dropped into a hydraulic press that was working. I doubt we will ever know.

A little heads up that we don’t make very public; for parts like these, high value or rare items, we check before dispatch. 1) all the bits are there, 2) the item is fit to send out and not damaged. Perhaps we need to take photographic evidence as proofs before sending. That’s a drastic step and time consuming considering the number of orders we send out. It shouldn’t be necessary to be fair, but we may not have a choice.

The reason we check is exactly for this eventuality. We have no idea why this part was so unlucky enough to be dropped this many times, in the same location, in a recessed part of the rotor. We can only wonder why.

Adam was not impressed that the part was “dropped” and did not send out new parts. The money was refunded and the (ex)customer has been allocated the “C” button and is now a proud owner on the “C” list who won’t be buying from us again.

So, that leaves the question what happens to the part? It gets taken to the scrap skip and the company has lost a chunk of money as it can’t be resold and we can’t use it either. As a business model that’s not sustainable. Mustang Maniac has to make, (trigger warning) a “profit” just in case this happens. Other than that we could add the loss to the rest of these parts which will go up and people moan about the cost of the parts again.

Were we right? Should we have even given a refund or said no? In the interests of customer service we refunded. Can you imagine the furore on the social media? ‘Look what we got sent by Mustang Maniac etc’.

WebShop

It’s no secret that Mustang Maniac like the front disc and rear drum setups on the Mustangs. It can never hurt to have a little extra stopping power at your feet. With that in mind Adam has sourced a new range of 2 1/2″ rear brake drums. This offers quite a bit more surface area for the rears. These drums are stock looking, but pack a punch.

First the drums come with a backing plate with both left and right hand side handbrake fitting. They also come with the brake cylinder.

Inside, the brake shoes are huge, all new springs and upgraded hardware for the self adjusting system. These need to be on show to be honest!

We have already sold two sets of these and will be on the WebShop soon. They won’t be the cheapest rear drum set that you will buy, but you are getting a lot for your money.

Stay Safe & Take Care!

About Mustang Maniac

A business dedicated to restoration of Classic Mustangs. We supply parts, service, restoration and custom builds. Anything Mustang we can help.
This entry was posted in Brake Kits, Customers' Cars, Mustang, Parts, Webshop and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to Hammer Time

  1. That brake disc is a joke. No way was that dropped. You were wrong! Why, because you gave a refund, I don’t think I would have done. We have learned that MM are an honest and honourable company to deal with. I will continue to use you guys, supporting UK companies and jobs!. Well done guys.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Simon says:

    In my opinion they were er taking the piss. BUT sometimes we must swallow our pride and take a hit just to protect the hard won reputation. WELL DONE!!!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Antony Mealing says:

    Personally I think Adam has done more than enough refunding the money for the brake disc
    Don’t think idd have been so generous with someone who is so blatantly trying to pull the wool over your eyes .

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks. We’re glad people can see for themselves and make their own mind up. But it does look remarkable the dame is in one area! We reckon if you chucked it out if a plane it wouldn’t be damaged that bad. 🤦

      Like

  4. Mark says:

    It’s unfortunate some try to go that route. It’s obvious that is not shipping damage. Rather than own up to the fact they ruined a good part, they fall on the old sop “it’s a business, they just write it off, it doesn’t cost them a thing”. I think you took the only course of action you can… not argue with them, refund the money and move on, with the security of knowing they won’t be bothering you again.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Mark.
      We are only a small business taking constant losses like that we can’t sustain. We have overheads as well to pay so we need to make a profit, when that profit gets eaten into we have to put prices up. People don’t realise that a pallet of stock like for like 18 months ago has gone up nearly 5 times what it was. Those types of increases are carried by the business. Imagine a £2 bulb was to cost you £10 a week later, we wouldn’t be in business. But that is what we are dealing with, small margins now. Thanks for your support and understanding which is appreciated.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I think we all know what happened to the disc. A well deserved ‘C’.

    Liked by 1 person

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