Our new Shelby

We got a new Shelby and it’s not a Ford!

A couple of weeks ago we said watch this space….. Well the wait is over, here it is!

First of all we love our Mustangs and always will do and no we have not gone over to the other “Mopar” side. This is our 1987 Dodge Charger Shelby GLHS. This rarity came up for sale and we decided to get it for a number of reasons. Firstly it has a FULL and I mean full history, in fact the folder is overflowing with the original registration documents, owners manual, receipts, MOTs, and parts purchased from new from that we can see. The second reason speaks for itself, it’s a Shelby after all. This model was only produced in a very limited number of 1000, ours is number 693.  The previous owner has spend some serious time looking up details of this and the other Dodge Shelby numbers, there are quite a few with details and a few missing obviously. It would be nice to complete this but we simply don’t have the man hours to dedicate to it.  This car has a great published provenance and has appeared in a number of magazines articles, we have converted them to PDF articles and added quick links below. You can find the articles attached to the photos under Our Cars – Dodge Charger Shelby. We have added video on you tube to have a look around this car and listen to the engine as it is at the moment.

What does the GLH or GLHS stand for?

(this is true) – GLH stood for “Goes Like Hell” and GLHS stood for Goes Like Hell S’more

Would it surprise you to say that that the great man himself had car number 1?

Our photos before the work starts:

A little background on the Dodge Charger Shelbys:

Based on the Dodge Charger Shelby — Modified and sold as Shelbys 

Limited to 1000

Base price:  $12,995

For 1987, Carroll Shelby purchased the last 1,000 ’87 Shelby Chargers and had them shipped to the Whittier factory for modification.  As with the ’86 GLH-S all the cars came in single stage black without a clear coat.

The ’87 GLHS received the Turbo II with MP EFI air-to-air intercooled SOHC inline-four, cast-iron block and aluminum head. This was mated with the Chrysler close-ratio A-525 transmission.  This combination produced 175 hp at 5300 rpm and 175 lb-ft of torque at 2200-4800 rpm.  Compression ratio was 8.5:1 with bore x stroke of 3.44 x 3.62 inches.  It ran 0-60 in 6.95 seconds, the ¼ mile ET at 14.7 at 94mph, and a top speed of 134 MPH.

As with the ’86 GLH-S, the suspension was upgraded with Koni adjustable struts/shocks, anti-roll bars, and the alignment was altered slightly. The tires remained 205/50VR-15 Goodyear Eagle VR Gatorbacks, mounted on 15×6 inch Shelby “Centurion II” aluminum wheels.  The power-assist Kelsey-Hayes brakes featured 10.2 x .94-inch vented discs with 54mm single pistons in front and 8.0 x 1.28-inch drums in the rear.

Aside from the aforementioned black exterior, Shelby added a wider windshield decal (minus the CS logos), there were some unique name-badge decals, and larger GLHS decal on the c-pillar.  All were equipped identically with grey interior, a leather-wrapped steering wheel and gearshift knob, air conditioning, cassette stereo, sunroof, non-armrest center console and numbered dash plaque.  The 1987 Shelby Charger rear window louvers were no longer available on the 1987 GLH-S.

Quick Links to the individual PDF’s

Dodge Charger Shelbys History by Year

Dodge Shelby Charger

Dodge Shelby – Readers Rides

Dodge Shelby – Motor Trend

Dodge Shelby – Latest Weapon

Dodge Shelby – Hot Rod

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6 thoughts on “Our new Shelby

  1. I shared this with my son Jon and he recognized that this is not here in America because of the two red cars in the background? Can you identify them for us?

    Like

    • Hi Debbie,
      Sorry for the late reply I had to Fly out for some quick business.
      You are correct, the Shelby is over here in the UK. On the picture Shel4 in the background there are two red cars. The car nearest to the Shelby is a Ford Puma, the other is a Seat. Hope that helps.
      Thanks.

      Like

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